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Sesame Pork Meatballs

Sesame Pork Meatballs are the perfect appetizer, hors d’oeuvre, main course, or snack… delicious and healing!
sesame pork meatballs

If it’s getting close to dinner time and I still have no idea what to make or what I’m in the mood for, my go-to is oftentimes some kind of meatball. I always keep a variety of organic ground meats in my freezer just for times like this. This recipe for sesame pork meatballs was born on one of these nights.

I go through phases with foods and cooking. Sometimes I will make the same type of ethnic food for weeks at a time, just because that’s what I’m feelin’ at the time. I learned long ago that when I cook what I’m in the mood for and what my body is craving, the food comes out awesome. If I make something that I really have no interest in… ummmm…. it can come out really bad. And yes, I too have some epic kitchen failures.

Asian food is one cuisine that I have a love-hate relationship with. I can go for months without touching it and then… bam… I have to have it. A lot.

Last week, when I was hot and tired and didn’t feel like cooking but I also didn’t feel like going out, I opened my freezer and peeked in. I did what most of us do: I stood there and stared. I moved some things around as if by doing so something new would appear. Needless to say, it didn’t.

I really do keep several packages of ground meat in the freezer. I’ve got ground lamb, bison, beef, pork, and chicken in there right now as I write this post. When I know the flavors I’m in the mood for, ground meat can become my canvas for those flavors. That’s what happened here. These sesame pork meatballs have a slight Asian taste and that’s exactly what I wanted. And the sesame seed coating makes them a little crunchy… yum… just perfect.

I didn’t use any grains in these meatballs. Instead, I used chickpea crumbs. This is an awesome invention — they are sold in bags in lots of markets now and I just love to substitute them for breadcrumbs. (See the recipe below, for  details on the chickpea crumbs I used.)

These are not messy balls. They can be eaten with your fingers. And that is my favorite way to eat everything. The sesame seed coating helps keep the moisture and juices inside the meatballs… kind of like M&Ms. Well, not exactly, but I think you get the picture. Pick one up, dip it in your favorite Asian dipping sauce, and pop it in your mouth. Perfection.

If you’re a meatball fan like I am, you should also try my recipe for Paleo Buffalo Chicken Meatballs With Ranch.

sesame pork meatballs

I love to customize recipes for specific health concerns. Let me customize a meatball recipe for you that will work for whatever’s going on in your body now… I’m such a geek that I really do get excited about doing this. So CLICK HERE to be taken directly into my calendar to sign up for your free phone consultation.

sesame pork meatballs

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in this recipe for sesame pork meatballs:

Pork strengthens the digestive system, helps with constipation, and can moisten a dry cough and other dryness in the body. It’s also good to strengthen your qi and give you energy.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. You can use black sesame seeds, white sesame seeds, or a combination of both for this recipe.

Chickpeas actually help calm the spirit. They relieve anxiety and soothe irritability… it kind of makes you realize why hummus is so popular. I used chickpea crumbs instead of breadcrumbs in these meatballs.

sesame pork meatballs

If you make these Sesame Pork Meatballs, please be sure to let me know in the comments below. I love hearing how you like a recipe, and I love to answer your questions! If you make it, be sure to take a photo and tag me and post it on Instagram.

Sesame Pork Meatballs
Author: 
Recipe type: meatballs, appetizer, hors d'oeuvre, finger food, main course
Cuisine: Asian, grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12-15 balls
 
These meatballs have a slight Asian taste and they are crispy on the outside and so moist on the inside... delicious and healing!
Ingredients
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • ¼ cup ketchup
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • ½ tsp tandoori spice (or use your favorite Asian spice)
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp dried minced onion flakes
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ cup chickpea crumbs (or substitute your favorite crumbs)
  • ½ cup raw sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment paper.
  3. Combine all ingredients, except sesame seeds, in a large bowl.
  4. Mush it up with your hands until it's combined.
  5. Form the mixture into golf-ball size balls.
  6. Pour the sesame seeds onto a plate.
  7. Roll the balls in the seeds so they are coated on all sides.
  8. Arrange the balls on the tray so that they are not touching each other.
  9. Bake for 10 mins, then flip them over and bake for another 10 mins or until they are cooked through.
  10. Serve alone or with your favorite Asian dipping sauce.
  11. Enjoy!

sesame pork meatballs

17 Foods To Boost Your Mood

It’s pretty awesome that there are foods you can eat to elevate your mood. It’s true that food really IS medicine! The next time you need a little mood boost or emotional pick-me-up, pull out this list of 17 Foods To Boost Your Mood… Read more

Sprouted Grain Chicken Cutlets

Seeds can be your best friend. Many of them are great for digestion and are considered longevity foods. This chicken’s got a bunch of ’em…

sprouted grain chicken cutlets

This is my number 1 go-to recipe. Everyone likes it. Everyone. Ok, well, not my vegetarian and vegan friends. But everyone else. And, I’m going to be bold and say that about 90% of all those who eat it, ask me for the recipe. This recipe for sprouted grain chicken cutlets is that good. I know, you may be dubious, but don’t roll your eyes until you’ve tried it.

This chicken is crispy. The outside layer actually crunches in your mouth, but the chicken itself stays so moist. This is due to a combination of things. First, I highly recommend using boneless chicken thighs, not breasts — these are more flavorful and they don’t dry out like breasts can. Also, I use olive oil, not eggs, to moisten the chicken before dredging it in the magically easy crispy coating mixture.

And, about that magical coating mixture… it’s so easy to make (see the recipe below) and it contains superfoods to heal your body. Ummmmm…. what are you waiting for? You’ve got to try this one!

Perhaps the best part of this sprouted grain chicken cutlets recipe is its versatility. Sometimes I make them into Chicken Milanese by piling a huge mound of salad greens and tomatoes on top. Sometimes, I serve them as-is with a few dipping sauces. Sometimes, I make them into a Chicken Parmesan of sorts. But I alwaysmake enough so that I can store leftovers in the fridge. These magically cutlets make the best leftovers. Cut them up for salads, sandwiches, or just eat them straight out of the fridge.

Okay, are you ready to make them?

And, if you are looking for another awesome chicken recipe, try my Chicken Souvlaki Bowls.

sprouted grain chicken cutletssprouted grain chicken cutlets

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in these sprouted grain chicken cutlets:

Chicken is something I push people to buy organic if possible. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery or childbirth. People who have some conditions that we consider “excess heat” conditions should limit the amount of chicken they eat. So, if you have an illness that gives you a bright red tongue or severe dryness in your body, check with your doctor first. For example, if you have a lot of burning stomach acid, you should avoid chicken for awhile…

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc…. In this recipe, I prefer to use garlic powder instead of fresh garlic because sometimes the fresh garlic can burn here, and I hate the taste of burned garlic.

Chia seeds are ancient seeds that got their name from the Mayan word for “strength”. These tiny seeds have the unique ability to turn liquid into a gel-like substance when making puddings and they are great added to smoothies and shakes. They are really good for you because they are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and fiber.

Hemp seeds are a superfood. They are high in protein, easily digestible, and contain a full complement of amino acids. They contain disease-fighting phytonutrients that are good for your blood, immune system, tissues and skin. Hemp contains a specific fatty acid that acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory. It also helps balance hormones, making it a great choice to fight the symptoms of PMS. This super seed is also good for your liver and your brain.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use black or white seeds, or a combination of both.

Flax seeds can relieve constipation and lower cholesterol.

Onions are great for your immune system; they are a natural antihistamine. In the winter, I eat lots and lots of onions… I guess I should feel sorry for the people close to me! Recently, I recommended that a patient with bronchitis put sliced raw onions in her socks when she went to sleep… she woke up so much better; they actually can rid the body of bacteria. (I know I’ve told you this before, but it really is awesome!) Onion is a superhero in the food world! For this recipe, dried onion flakes (the ones you can buy in a jar) are perfect!

sprouted grain chicken cutlets

Sprouted Grain Chicken Cutlets
Author: 
Recipe type: chicken, main course, whole grains
Cuisine: American, classic, comfort food, simple
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
This is my most-requested recipe. Make a batch of this and you will have healthy dinners all week long.
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 400° F convection setting, or 425°F regular bake setting.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Pour the oil into a shallow pie plate or bowl.
  4. In a second shallow pie plate or bowl, combine the cereal, seasonings, and seeds. Stir until combined well.
  5. Roll each piece of chicken in the oil and then in the seed mixture, making sure each piece is well-coated. Place the chicken onto the tray, making sure that they are not touching each other.
  6. Bake in oven for 20 minutes, or until cooked through.
  7. Enjoy!

 

sprouted grain chicken cutlets

Szechuan Zoodles

This recipe will actually make you feel cooler and calmer…

szechuan zoodles

It’s holiday season, but in my book that doesn’t mean everything we eat has to be heavy and traditional. This dish is neither, but it’s awesome. When I brought a big bowl of these Szechuan Zoodles to my family’s Hanukkah party, they certainly looked non-traditional next to the latkes but they made everyone happy. I’m all for healthy and happy, so if I were you, I’d give this dish a shot at your holiday party!

I saw this recipe on one of my favorite food blogs, Half Baked Harvest and the beautiful pics kind of called to me, so I knew I was going to have to make some version of them!

I’ve made zoodle dishes before and some have them have been great, while some have been only so-so. While I do love these vegetable noodles, I am a true pasta fanatic, so sometimes I end up a little disappointed. This dish is especially great because the zucchini noodles are mixed with buckwheat noodles, so in the end, this slurpy and spicy pasta dish tastes like real pasta. That’s always a really good thing…

And the dressing… OMG… it’s spicy and sweet and peanut buttery and it’s made in the blender… so it’s easy.

A real pasta dish that’s paleo, healing, spicy, slightly sweet, vibrant, and fresh… who could ask for anything more?

For another awesome paleo pasta dish try my recipe for Roasted Red Pepper Fettuccine.

szechuan zoodles

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in these Szechuan Zoodles:

Zucchini cools your body off and makes you feel better when you are feeling hot. It helps your body release excess heat and it will make your mind feel more calm.

Buckwheat is great to eat if you have diarrhea. It also helps lower blood pressure, stops some types of sweating, and has a good amount of vitamin E. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight cancer and heart disease.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use black or white seeds, or a combination of both.

Peanuts, contrary to what some believe, are actually good for many things in your body. I don’t often let myself eat them because they sometimes contain mold and it’s really hard to find reasonably priced organic healthy peanuts. But, these popular nuts are great for lessening edema; they act like a diuretic. They can also help you if you have insomnia or if you are breast feeding. An old-time remedy is to made peanut tea and drink it for bed to promote sleep. And, peanut shells used to be used to help with high blood pressure.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese Parsley. It is good for the common cold, indigestion, and energy flow in the body. An old Chinese remedy for the common cold and even for measles was to drink cilantro and mint tea. Cilantro is one of those herbs you either love or hate; I’m a lover…

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion.

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsicum. Capsicum actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

szechuan zoodles

Szechwan Zoodles
Author: 
Recipe type: zoodles, pasta, spaghetti, spicy, paleo, vegan, vegetarian, Asian
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Half Baked Harvest
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
This dish is made with zucchini noodles and buckwheat spaghetti. The sauce is the perfect combination of spicy and sweet! It's paleo, healthy, and comforting!
Ingredients
  • 20 oz zucchini noodles (I bought mine pre-zoodled, but I would guess 2 large zucchini would do the trick if you are spiralizing them yourself)
  • 1 lb buckwheat spaghetti, cooked al dente (I used these buckwheat/sweet potato ones)
  • ½ cup peanut butter (here's an organic one)
  • ½ cup tahini
  • ¼ cup liquid aminos (you can buy it here)
  • juice of 2 limes
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar (here's a good one)
  • 2 Tbs hot chili oil
  • 1 Tbs toasted sesame oil
  • ½ cup full-fat canned coconut milk
  • ¼ cup hot water
  • 1 cup chopped peanuts
  • ¼ cup sesame seeds (buy organic ones here)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 10 baby bell peppers, sliced
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 hot pepper, sliced
Instructions
  1. Boil the buckwheat noodles, just until they are cooked al dente.
  2. Drain them and run cold water over them while you toss them around with your hands to make sure they don't stick together.
  3. Place the buckwheat noodles and the zucchini noodles in a large bowl.
  4. Make the dressing: Put the peanut butter, tahini, aminos, lime juice, coconut sugar, chili oil, sesame oil, coconut milk, and ¼ cup hot water into your blender. Whiz it up until very creamy.
  5. Put the remaining ingredients into the bowl with the noodles.
  6. Add in as much dressing as you like and toss with your hands (you will probably have some extra dressing).
  7. Enjoy!

szechuan zoodles

Sesame Green Beans

Sesame green beans are a staple in my house… they are so simple, so healing, and they can be served at room temperature!

sesame green beans

Every now and then I feel the need to post a really simple but delicious recipe. Sometimes I get a little too chef-y and I forget that simple is often better. Well, you can’t get more simple than this recipe for sesame green beans. And, you can’t get any better either!

What’s better than a fresh veggie, cooked perfectly so that it’s crisp-tender? These green beans are slightly steamed, then tossed with a tiny bit of toasted sesame oil, sesame seeds, and sea salt.  That’s it.  Nothing chef-y about the prep, only in the taste! Everyone will love this…

This side dish has been my go-to all summer long. It goes great with grilled meats, with my favorite paleo pasta dishes, and honestly, there’re nothing better than grabbing a leftover handful straight out of the fridge. I think these beans taste best cold or at room temperature, so that makes it even easier. You can make these awesome green beans way before you plan to serve them and, I can’t stress this enough: they are so easy to make!

For another simple vegetable dish, make my Simple Baby Bok Choy recipe.

sesame green beans

There are only a few ingredients in this recipe, but they are great healing ones:

Green beans have a lot of fiber, vitamin A, vitamin B, and iron. Eating green beans can help rid the body of toxins and can help regulate metabolism. They also can help relieve that feeling of excessive fullness in your stomach and excessive belching. In Chinese medicine, green beans are eaten to clear up chronic diarrhea and even for some lower back pain.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use black or white seeds, or a combination of both.

sesame green beans

Sesame Green Beans
Author: 
Recipe type: American, side dish, simple
Cuisine: vegetables, beans
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6
 
Fresh green beans are gently steamed and then tossed with toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds... this is the perfect side dish for everything... and it's so easy!
Ingredients
  • 1 lb green beans, trimmed
  • 3 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • ¼ cup sesame seeds
  • sea salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Steam the beans just until they are slightly tender. Don't overcook them!
  2. Drain and toss with remaining ingredients.
  3. Serve hot, cold, or at room temperature.
  4. Enjoy!

sesame green beans

Vegetable Hummus Dip

This vegetable hummus dip make store bought hummus taste incredible!

vegetable hummus dip

I love to entertain. The whole process de-stresses me. I’m not one of those people who sits around ruminating about what to serve and how to present it and how to time everything just right. I just kind of wing it. Easy entertaining is one of the things people ask me about all of the time. Well, this dip is for all of you who want a great easy entertaining recipe to serve your guests while you are getting dinner ready.

This recipe is like a “food hack”. What I mean by that is that it easily takes a store-bought ingredient and turns it into something super awesome. I mean really, really awesome. So-good-that-everyone-will-be-asking-you-for-the-recipe awesome.

The base of this vegetable hummus dip recipe is store-bought hummus. Add then we add a bunch of stuff to it. And we make it pretty. And we spice it up.  And serve it with beautiful crunchy vegetables for dipping. And amazing sprouted grain crackers. And it’s truly incredible.

I saw a version of this dip on one of my favorite blogs (Minimalist Baker) and I took some creative license and made it suit my needs. My guests loved it and I’ve made different versions of it many times since (even when I didn’t have any guests)… it’s really that good. I really feel like I’m spoiling myself when I make this just for my family.

If you are looking for another great use for chickpeas, try my Spicy Chickpea, Turkey, And Tomato Stew. 

vegetable hummus dipvegetable hummus dip

Here are some of the awesome healing ingredients in this vegetable hummus dip:

Chickpeas actually help calm the spirit. They relieve anxiety and soothe irritability… it kind of makes you realize why hummus is so popular…

Turmeric is a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Sesame seeds have many great nutritional benefits. They are an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. Black sesame seeds are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This recipe uses tahini sauce, which is a paste made from sesame seeds and oil (I buy this read-made in a can or a jar).

Parsley has been shown to reduce tumors in the lungs and to neutralize the effects of carcinogens, including cigarette smoke. It is high in vitamins A and C, and is good for your heart. This herb is also a natural breath freshener. So, if you have a chance to use more than a few sprigs as a garnish, go for it.

Scallions, as I tell you often, are one of my favorites. In Chinese medicine, the root of the scallion is a healing herb (Cong Bai). I always keep scallions on hand in my refrigerator so that I can whip up a batch of cold and flu fighting tea (scallion roots and ginger) the second anyone feels that scratchy throat coming on. It helps the body sweat out toxins. Scallions are antiviral and antibacterial; they are good for the common cold and general nasal congestion — just don’t eat too many if you have a fever.

Dill is considered a chemoprotective herb that can help neutralize some carcinogens and it’s also an antibacterial herb.

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to aid in digestion and to help detoxify the body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

vegetable hummus dip

Vegetable Hummus Dip
Author: 
Recipe type: appetizer, dip, easy entertaining, Greek, Mediterranean
Cuisine: Recipe adapted from:Minimalist Baker
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
This is the perfect easy-entertaining dip. It takes store-bought hummus to amazing new heights. And it's healing and delicious and so pretty...
Ingredients
  • 1 15-oz can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1-tsp for the veg salad topping
  • 1 tsp coconut sugar
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ¾ tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 10 grinds of black pepper
  • 1 cup store-bought hummus
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • juice of ½ a lemon, plus a bit extra for the veg salad topping
  • ¼ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 tsp minced fresh dill
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 20 grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 scallion, sliced
  • hot sauce, for garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Combine the chickpeas in a small bowl with the oil, coconut sugar, smoked paprika, cumin, turmeric, oregano, salt, and pepper.
  3. Spread them out on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  4. Roast in the oven until the chickpeas are beginning to brown and get a bit crispy (mine took about 35 minutes).
  5. Meanwhile, make the sauce: stir together the tahini, lemon juice, almond milk, dill, and garlic. Set aside.
  6. Make the salad for the top: In a small bowl, combine the parsley, tomatoes, scallion, 1-tsp of olive oil and a quick squeeze of lemon juice.
  7. Spread the hummus on a serving platter.
  8. Top with the tahini sauce mixture and the vegetable salad.
  9. Garnish with a bit of hot sauce if you like.
  10. Serve with crackers and/or fresh vegetables to dip.

vegetable hummus dip

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers make the perfect appetizer, snack, or dinner — just the right amount of spice.

crispy buffalo chicken fingers

We love to eat with our hands in my house. Sometimes it makes sense, and sometimes it’s just plain embarrassing. Sandwiches make sense; salad does not. I never established any rules for this, so we just live with the poor manners of our habits and hope no one’s watching.

If I told you that I served this chicken alongside my recent recipe for Paleo Fettuccine Alfredo, how grossed out would you be to learn that those leftovers were eaten cold the next day and with fingers, not forks…

If there’s food in the fridge that can be eaten without utensils, that’s the food that everyone goes for first. These Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers can and should be eaten with your hands… and not just by the vulgar people in my house! In the photo below, you can see Steve holding this awesome chicken in his hands — I had to take the picture quickly, because they were headed for his mouth quickly, even though it was early in the morning. (I wish you could see his shirt in this pic because he’s wearing a T-shirt we got when we went to “Meet The Breeds” at the Westminster Dog Show; I’ll have to take another pic of him in it!)

One of the awesome things about this recipe is that it’s so easily customizable for your particular needs and tastes. Sometimes I put hemp seeds in the coating. Sometimes I use flax seeds. Chia seeds are also good in it. And if you like sesame seeds, you can toss them in too. You can use any seeds you like, a mixture of all of them, or none of them at all. Decisions, decisions…

You should also try my recipe for Crispy Spicy Chicken for another take on a healthy version of decadent tasting chicken.

crispy buffalo chicken fingers

Not only are these crispy Buffalo chicken fingers delicious, but they are really healthy too:

Chicken is something I push people to buy organic if possible. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery or childbirth. People who have some conditions that we consider “excess heat” conditions should limit the amount of chicken they eat. So, if you have an illness that gives you a bright red tongue or severe dryness in your body, check with your doctor first. For example, if you have a lot of burning stomach acid, you should avoid chicken for awhile…

Tapioca is a starch that comes from the cassava plant. It’s not really a flour in the traditional sense; it’s grain and gluten free. It’s good for your circulation and your digestion. Oftentimes I will make recipes with tapioca flour — it crisps things up well and it works as a great thickener too.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. Whenever I have a cold I eat lots of hot sauce. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot sauce you like. Read the ingredients on the label (as with any pre-made food) to make sure it meets your dietary requirements — there are so many hot sauces, wing sauces, and barbecue sauces out there that are gluten-free, paleo, etc. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

In Asian medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten-free. Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation. This recipe uses both almond milk and almond flour, so you get a lot of bang for your buck with almonds here.

Hemp seeds are a superfood. They are high in protein, easily digestible, and contain a full complement of amino acids. They contain disease-fighting phytonutrients that are good for your blood, immune system, tissues and skin. Hemp contains a specific fatty acid that acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory. It also helps balance hormones, making it a great choice to fight the symptoms of PMS. This super seed is also good for your liver and your brain.

Flax seeds can relieve constipation and lower cholesterol.

Chia seeds are ancient seeds that got their name from the Mayan word for “strength”. These tiny seeds have the unique ability to turn liquid into a gel-like substance when making puddings and they are great added to smoothies and shakes. They are really good for you because they are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and fiber.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness.

crispy buffalo chicken fingers

Crispy Buffalo Chicken Fingers
Author: 
Recipe type: chicken, entree, appetizer
Cuisine: recipe inspired by: Brittany Angell
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
These chicken fingers are crispy, a bit spicy, and are really healthy. Make a big batch because they will go fast!
Ingredients
  • 1-1/2 lb. boneless organic chicken thighs, cut into thirds vertically
  • Wet ingredients:
  • 6 Tbs of your favorite Buffalo wing sauce (this is one of the few recipes I buy traditional, not organic... and here's a gallon of it!)
  • ¼ cup almond milk
  • 3 Tbs grass-fed butter
  • Dry ingredients:
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • ½ cup almond flour (I like this one)
  • ¼ cup of whatever seeds you like (hemp seeds, chia seeds, flax seeds, sesame seeds) (optional)
  • 20 grinds of fresh black pepper
  • ½ tsp sea salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Combine all of the wet ingredients in a small pot and heat over medium-low heat, whisking until the butter is melted and the mixture is thickened a bit, about 5 mins.
  4. Pour the mixture into a large bowl.
  5. In a shallow pie plate, combine all of the dry ingredients. Feel free to use any or all of the seeds mentioned above (or none at all). Mix well.
  6. Season the chicken with sea salt.
  7. Put all of the chicken pieces into the bowl with the wet mixture. Stir until coated well.
  8. Remove each piece of chicken individually, and dredge in the dry mixture and place each piece on the baking sheet in a single layer, making sure that none of the pieces are touching each other. Make sure each piece is heavily coated!
  9. Bake the chicken until cooked through and crispy. Mine took about 40 minutes.
  10. Remove from the oven and serve on a platter with whatever dipping sauces you like. (We never made it to the dipping sauce stage... they were all eaten too fast!)

crispy buffalo chicken fingers