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Tomato Free Marinara Sauce

If you literally can’t stomach tomatoes, this tomato free marinara sauce will have you jumping for joy!

tomato free marinara sauce

I over-indulged to such an extent this summer that I set-back my digestive system to where it was before I knew how to heal myself with food. Really… it is still quite unbelievable to me that I could possibly do this to myself after so many years of feeling great.

If you don’t know my story, I’ll back up a bit and give it to you in a nutshell here. I used to have terrible digestive issues. The doctors thought I had ulcerative colitis and I was on a ton of medications. I had to know where every bathroom was at all times and I lived in pain. Fast forward and I went to cooking school and then got my Master’s degree in Oriental medicine and I learned to heal myself — and all of you — with food and herbs. And I’ve been healthy now for at least 10 years.

Can you believe I was able to screw up so badly? I still can’t! But, now that I know what I’m doing, I am able to reverse all of the damage I have done fairly quickly. It’s been about 3 weeks so far and I am already feeling pretty awesome — not perfect yet but close.

One of the foreign symptoms I started experiencing is acid reflux. This was a new one for me, so I used it as a learning experience. I can now say that if someone asks me what to do for acid reflux, I can help. A lot.

As part of my experimentation on myself, I created a bunch of digestive and acid friendly recipes. This is one of the recipes I’ve been making. I wish I could take credit for the creation of this genius Tomato Free Marinara Sauce, but all of the credit goes to Bethany at Lil Sipper. It really is the most creative and genius recipe I’ve seen. And it’s only got a few ingredients. And the blender does all of the work.

I put this sauce on chickpea pasta and I loved it. It honestly tastes like traditional marinara sauce. Then came the test. I served it to Steve and watched for a reaction. He ate the whole bowl and had no idea it wasn’t a tomato-based sauce. That’s a win!

So, what’s in this magic Tomato Free Marinara Sauce you ask? Okay, I’ll tell you: the base is made of beets and canned pumpkin and bone broth. Just scroll down for the complete recipe. By the way, bone broth is great for so many things, so I’ve been replacing my traditional stocks and broths with bone broth in every recipe I can! And then we add the seasonings (and it’s the seasonings that give it the traditional marinara taste). But that’s it. Really… I can’t get over how magical this is.

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All of my rambling aside, you really can heal your digestive system by being creative with foods. This Tomato Free Marinara Sauce is a perfect example of the phenomenal rewards you can reap when you are willing to give some out-of-the-box ideas a try. So……. are you ready to try?

tomato free marinara sauce

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in this Tomato Free Marinara Sauce:

Beets are SO good for you. I try to find ways to fit them into my meals as much as possible. Really… many times a week. Beets nourish blood and tonify the heart. Athletes are starting to drink beet juice as a form of endurance therapy. They are anti-carcinogenic, good for anemia, and relieve constipation. I also think it’s a great idea to eat them raw sometimes because their amazing goodness is even more pumped up this way.

Pumpkin can help reduce pain and fever and can soothe stomach irritations. It’s a great food to treat constipation, allergies and asthma. It’s high in vitamin A and can help protect your lungs and intestines from cancer.

Bone broth heals your digestive system. It is filled with collagen and gelatin. Both of these substances, when slowly heated for an extended period of time, have been shown to actually heal your gut lining. The glucosamine in bone broth can reduce inflammation throughout your body and it can also strengthen your bones. When you add bone broth to your diet, you are able to reduce inflammation in your joints, so your knees, elbows, shoulders, hips, wrists, etc. will start to feel less stiff. You will even start to reduce the pain in your joints with this addition to your lifestyle. It’s also great for your skin!

tomato free marinara sauce

Tomato Free Marinara Sauce
Author: 
Recipe type: pasta, paleo, digestive health, comfort food
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Lil Sipper
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8
 
If tomatoes don't work for your digestion, this tomato free marinara sauce recipe is a must for you! It's so delicious and so simple... and it tastes like the real thing!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin puree
  • 3 baby beets (cooked) (I used store-bought pre-cooked beets)
  • ½ cup bone broth (I used chicken but you can use any flavor you like)
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • generous amount of sea salt, to taste
  • ½ tsp coconut sugar
  • 1 lb pasta, cooked al dente (I usedgrain-free chickpea pasta by Banza)
Instructions
  1. Put the pumpkin, beets, and bone broth into your blender.
  2. Whiz it up until it's smooth and creamy.
  3. Stir in the oregano, basil, and salt.
  4. Note: add in a little salt, stir, and taste. Then keep repeating until it tastes good to you. I found it needed more salt than I usually use.
  5. Toss your pasta with as much sauce as you like.
  6. Enjoy!

tomato free marinara sauce

Eating To Ward Off Cancer

Eating to ward off cancer means removing the foods from your diet that cancer cells feed on, while simultaneously adding in the food, herbs, and supplements that cancer cells hate. Read more

Pumpkin Turmeric Latte

pumpkin turmeric latte

I have never been a “winter” person. I just hate the cold. But, over the years as I have learned to practice gratitude on a daily basis, I have found many things I love about winter. Don’t get me wrong — I still prefer a beach to a snowy mountain, but there are so many reasons to truly be happy about winter. And one of those things is a steaming cuppa… And this cuppa pumpkin turmeric latte is really something to make you smile, no matter how frigid the temp outside may be. Brrrrrrrrrrrrr….

Other than steaming favorful lattes, some of the things I now truly feel grateful for about winter are:

* Watching huge snowflakes fall from the sky (okay, so a lot of the time, I’m inside watching them, but still grateful)
* Christmas music (all the way from Thanksgiving to New Years)
* Fuzzy boots
* Big cozy sweaters
* Delicious bowls of hot steaming soup
* The smell of chestnuts roasting in the street vendors’ carts (yup, it’s just like the song says)
* My dogs’ total happiness in the snow
* Christmas movies

During the winter, I experiment with latte recipes all of the time. I mean, it’s like I’ve become possessed or something. And, I have never steamed my milk! I heat up my ingredients in a pot and these blitz it in the blender and pour it into my favorite mug. And ta-da we have an awesome latte.

Turmeric lattes are all the rage right now. There’s a little cafe around the corner from me that has them on the menu. But… blechhhhhh… they are gross. And I have no idea why. I mean, if you are putting in the right ingredients, it’s not hard to make it come out right. Anyway, these are the right ingredients, so go ahead whip this up!

And, after you drink this awesome pumpkin turmeric latte, if you want to try another warming winter recipe, try my Hot Chocolate Smoothie Bowl!

pumpkin turmeric latte

Here are some of the healing ingredients in this pumpkin turmeric latte:

Pumpkin can help reduce pain and fever and can soothe stomach irritations. It’s a great food to treat constipation, allergies and asthma. It’s high in vitamin A and can help protect your lungs and intestines from cancer.

Turmeric is actually a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Black pepper is also a Chinese herb (Hu Jiao). It’s used to control vomiting and diarrhea and is good for some stomach pains. This common herb also can help the body more easily absorb nutrients, and it is sometimes prescribed to lessen the symptoms of respiratory ailments. Be sure to use black pepper whenever you use turmeric, because it increases the body’s ability to absorb the turmeric.

Collagen strengthens bones and muscles, keeps your joints healthy, improves flexibility and concentration, and helps heal your digestive system. It also keeps you looking youthful.

Dates are rich in potassium, dietary fiber and tannins. Fiber is good for your gut and tannins help the body fight inflammation and infection. Dates are also rich in vitamin A and iron. The most amazing thing about dates is that they can be used to replace sugar in almost anything. I stopped using sweetened protein powders in my smoothies and now I use unsweetened ones but I add a few dates.

Cinnamon is one of the best herbs to warm the body. It’s great if you have a cold. If you are nauseous or have diarrhea, go for the cinnamon. It also gives you energy and helps with menstrual pain. Cinnamon is a Chinese herb: “gui zhi” is the cinnamon twig and “rou gui” is the cinnamon bark. Both are warming and are used for a variety of ailments. In the winter I add cinnamon to all sorts of foods. It helps with the common cold, swelling, various menstrual issues and some aches and pains. Be careful with it if you have a fever because it is so warming.

In Asian medicine, we use coconut to strengthen the body, reduce swelling, and stop bleeding. Coconut kills viruses, bacteria, and parasites. It’s good for all types of infections and viruses in the body, including the flu, bronchitis, tapeworms, urinary tract infections, and herpes. And perhaps most importantly, it helps you keep your mind sharp and it makes it easier for you to focus. I like to use full-fat canned coconut milk for these lattes.

pumpkin turmeric latte

Pumpkin Turmeric Latte
Author: 
Recipe type: beverage, latte, hot drink
Cuisine: paleo, whole30, breakfast, snack, dairy-free
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 3
 
This is the perfect cup of steaming deliciousness. It's so healing and no steamed milk is required. I make mine with dairy-free milk.
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat the coconut milk and the water in a small pot.
  2. Pour the hot milk into your blender and add the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Whiz it up good.
  4. Enjoy!

pumpkin turmeric latte

Creamy Vegan Baked Pumpkin Pasta

creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta

It’s pumpkin season! I know everyone gets so excited to go out and grab their pumpkin lattes, but not me. Don’t get me wrong — I love all things pumpkin too, but give me pumpkin comfort foods and I am the happiest ever. And this creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta blows your favorite pumpkin latte out of the water.

I never met a pasta I didn’t like. Especially a creamy pasta. Add in the fact that this is a hot and comfy baked pasta dish with a great crumb-topping, and you’ve got me drooling. So, when I saw a recipe for a baked pumpkin pasta by the amazing and inspiring Candice Kumai, I had to go for it.

What’s better than eating a delicious dinner with pumpkin in it while looking outside at the beautiful fall foliage? Nothing! Come on, look outside. Watch the leaves blowing around, smell the smells of fireplaces, open the windows and feel the slight chill in the air. Come on, do it. I live in the middle of the city, and I still open my windows and experience the wonder that is fall. Now, if I could figure out what kind of music to play while I’m cooking up all of this pumpkiny goodness… You know, winter is Christmas music in my kitchen. Summer is beachy music. But what’s fall? Hmmm… I’m open to suggestions…

I’ve made many pumpkin pasta dishes. Some of them end up looking like macaroni and cheese. Nothing wrong with that look… But, I’ve made the mistake of calling them something like pumpkin mac & cheese. This is a mistake, because it almost always disappoints the person I’m feeding, because while pumpkin pasta may look like mac and cheese, it doesn’t taste like it. But, pumpkin pasta is awesome. Especially this one… it’s creamy and pumpkiny and decadent tasting. I make mine with grain-free pasta and it is spectacular. I guess you get the point. I really think you should make this creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta.

For another delicious creamy vegan pasta dish, try my recipe for Creamy Mint Avocado Pasta.

creamy vegan baked pumpkin pastacreamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta

Look at some of the healing ingredients in this awesome creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta dish:

Pumpkin can help reduce pain and fever and can soothe stomach irritations. It’s a great food to treat constipation, allergies and asthma. It’s high in vitamin A and can help protect your lungs and intestines from cancer.

n Asian medicine, we use coconut to strengthen the body, reduce swelling, and stop bleeding. Coconut kills viruses, bacteria, and parasites. It’s good for all types of infections and viruses in the body, including the flu, bronchitis, tapeworms, urinary tract infections, and herpes. And perhaps most importantly, it helps you keep your mind sharp and it makes it easier for you to focus. I like to use full-fat canned coconut milk for this pasta.

Kale is everywhere these days. It is extremely nutritious, and because it to so popular you can find it already washed and prepared in lots of markets. Make sure you clean the kale leaves thoroughly and remove the center thick stems if they bother you (I don’t like to eat these think stems). This dark leafy green is a great source of fiber and calcium. It’s also rich in many minerals, including magnesium, iron and potassium. One serving contains 200% of the daily requirements of Vitamin C and 180% of Vitamin A.

Turmeric is actually a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric. I only used a little bit of turmeric in this pasta, so you don’t really taste it… but feel free to use as much as you like!

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

Nutritional yeast gives things a cheese-y taste without using any dairy and it adds amino acids and Vitamin B, iron, zinc, and selenium to your diet. Nutritional yeast is a complete protein and also contains fiber, so it’s a really good thing!

creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta

Creamy Vegan Baked Pumpkin Pasta
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
This is comfort food at it's most delicious. This healing vegan baked pasta is warming, delicious, simple, gooey, and just plain awesome.
Ingredients
  • 1 lb pasta of your choice (I used a grain free pasta)
  • 1-1/4 cups full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 15 oz can pure pumpkin (I buy them by the case)
  • ½ tsp turmeric powder
  • leaves of 3 thyme sprigs
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil (for greasing the pan)
  • For crumb topping:
  • 1 cup crumbs of choice (I used chickpea crumbs)
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp dried minced onion flakes
  • ¼ cup nutritional yeast
  • 1 cup chopped lacinto/dinosaur kale
  • ¼ cup vegan parmesan cheese
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 375°F.
  2. Grease a large square or rectangle baking pan with oil.
  3. Cook your pasta al dente, drain well, and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, make the sauce: Place the coconut milk, pumpkin, turmeric, thyme, garlic, and salt and pepper into the blender. I used my Vitamix. You can make this in a regular blender, but it make take a little time -- make sure you blend until very creamy and smooth.
  5. Stir the sauce into the pasta, and pour the mixture into the greased baking dish.
  6. Bake 30 minutes, then remove the pasta and switch the oven to the Broil setting.
  7. Make the crumb topping: Combine all ingredients in a small bowl.
  8. After 30 minutes in the oven, spread the crumb mixture all over the top of the pasta and broil for a few minutes, until the crumbs start to turn brown. Watch it carefully -- no burning allowed!
  9. Enjoy!

creamy vegan baked pumpkin pasta

Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes

Did you know that buckwheat is a seed and not a grain? There’s a debate as to whether or not it’s 100% paleo, but I think it is! And it can be a great fix for spontaneous sweating and high blood pressure… if you are looking for something that tastes and feels like a grain, you’ve got to try this!

paleo pumpkin pancakes

It’s pumpkin season! And it’s pancake season! Okay, so maybe there’s not really a pancake season, but there should be…

These Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes are so perfect, you shouldn’t need a reason to make them, but they taste so decadent, that you might feel like you are cheating on your healthy eating lifestyle. But you are not. Really. These are so good for you!

Breakfast is my favorite meal.  Always has been.  I’m like a breakfast freak. Steve gets on my case all of the time because the second I wake up I start planning my day around breakfast.  During the week this is easy because I usually have some type of shake. But on the weekends, it’s a different story.  I love to go out to breakfast. But, sometimes, like when I want pancakes, I’ll make them myself, because even here in Manhattan, it’s not so easy to find paleo pancakes when I want them.

So, when I woke up last Sunday, I popped out of bed (I’m an annoying morning person), and immediately started talking about breakfast. Steve looked at me, shook his head, and just kind of slid out of the room and put the dogs’ leashes on.  I knew there was no way he was entertaining my hugs restaurant brunch ideas… so as we walked the dogs, I formulated my homemade breakfast in my head.  And these Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes happened.  I can’t take the credit for the original recipe, because I got most of it from Erin at her awesome blog: Well Plated.

I’ve made lots of paleo pancakes before. But never with buckwheat. I don’t know why, except that I guess I never really thought or believed that buckwheat is paleo friendly. So I did some research. Buckwheat is a seed; it’s not a grain. And when it’s ground into a flour, it makes the most awesome pancakes. I’ve actually been experimenting with making risotto out of whole buckwheat groats lately and so far I’m loving the results (I’ll post a recipe soon).

These Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes are crisp on the outside and hot and smooth on the inside. Add some pure maple syrup and you feel like you are cheating on your diet. I mean, pumpkin and maple… this is a delicious flavor combo…

paleo pumpkin pancakespaleo pumpkin pancakes

Here are some of the reasons these pancakes are so healing:

Buckwheat is great to eat if you have diarrhea. It also helps lower blood pressure, stops some types of sweating, and has a good amount of vitamin E. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight cancer and heart disease.

Pumpkin can help reduce pain and fever and can soothe stomach irritations. It’s a great food to treat constipation, allergies and asthma. It’s high in vitamin A and can help protect your lungs and intestines from cancer.

In Asian medicine, we use coconut to strengthen the body, reduce swelling, and stop bleeding. Coconut kills viruses, bacteria, and parasites. It’s good for all types of infections and viruses in the body, including the flu, bronchitis, tapeworms, urinary tract infections, and herpes. And perhaps most importantly, it helps you keep your mind sharp and it makes it easier for you to focus. I like to use full-fat canned coconut milk for these pancakes.

I am a big proponent of eating the whole egg. So many of the nutrients and the taste are in the yolk; I’ll never understand separating nature’s perfect food. Eggs help with many types of dryness in the body. If you have a dry cough or a frog-in-your-throat, try eating some eggs. They have also been shown to help women with various conditions during and after pregnancy. Some people consider eggs to be a superfood. They contain a large amount of vitamins A and B and are a great source of protein. Eggs sometimes get a bad rap because of cholesterol, but it’s been shown that in 70% of people, eggs do not raise cholesterol, so don’t assume they are bad for you. Buy organic eggs and you are really doing the right thing.

paleo pumpkin pancakes

Paleo Pumpkin Pancakes
Author: 
Recipe type: breakfast, pancakes, pumpkin, buckwheat
Cuisine: paleo
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
These buckwheat pumpkin pancakes are paleo friendly; did you know that buckwheat is a seed and not a grain? These are so good and they are made in the blender!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour (you can buy it here)
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin puree (I buy them buy the case here)
  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 Tbs walnut oil (substitute whatever oil you like) (you can buy walnut oil here)
  • 2 Tbs pure maple syrup, plus more for serving
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp raw apple cider vinegar (buy this one)
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tsp coconut oil for greasing the pan (plus more if needed)
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients, except coconut oil in a blender. (I used my Vitamix, so it was quick)
  2. Blend until completely smooth.
  3. Heat oil in non-stick pan until hot.
  4. Pour in batter to form small pancakes (the small ones cooked better than the bigger ones).
  5. Cook on first side until completely done (wait until the edges start to brown and lots of bubbles appear on the top), then flip them.
  6. Cook shortly on the second side, until slightly crisp.
  7. Remove to plates and serve with maple syrup.
  8. Enjoy!

paleo pumpkin pancakes

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Fudge

Keep this pumpkin peanut butter fudge in your freezer and you’ll always have an awesome healing dessert ready to grab!

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Fudge-0012

Open your freezer right now. Look in. Is there a healthy grab-and-go bite-size dessert in there? If not, think how happy you would be if a tray of this deliciously creamy no-guilt fudge was starting at you.

This is how it works. I make at least one tray of petite freezer-friendly dessert every week. After dinner or when we are binge-watching TV shows, I don’t have to worry about it when Steve grabs his idea of healthy snacks (which somehow he can rationalize as being fried chips with a whole tub of dip), because I can just open the freezer and grab the best desserts ever.

This fudge is not one of those desserts that “tastes good for something that’s healthy.”

It IS really good… even if it wasn’t healthy you would grab it. I mean it. Really.

With this pumpkin peanut butter fudge in the freezer, the chips in our cabinet went stale. Yup, this one’s a winner and even trumped the chips in flavor.

A great thing about this fudge: you can  have 2 or 3 pieces without killing your diet. It’s actually good for you, tastes like a combination of decadent peanut butter fudge co-mingled with an ice-cream bonbon, and no cooking experience is required.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Fudge (single)-0047

I’ve made many batches of healthy fudge, but this one is my favorite. Here’s what’s in it and why it’s so good for you:

Pumpkin can help reduce pain and fever and can soothe stomach irritations. It’s a great food to treat constipation, allergies and asthma. It’s high in vitamin A and can help protect your lungs and intestines from cancer.

Cashews are really a multi-tasking nut. I use them all the time so I say it all the time: Cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts. Most of the fat in cashews is unsaturated and is made up of oleic acid; this is the same acid that is found in olive oil, making these nuts a heart-healty choice. For this fudge I used cashew butter and it really is just perfect — I like the creaminess it lends to the fudge and it tastes awesome. I know some of you have a problem finding raw nuts sometimes — I’m happy to try to help you locate them if you need shopping suggestions, so just leave a comment and I will try to help. I buy then whenever and wherever I see them. I’m also lucky enough to live near a Whole Foods, so I sometimes buy them from the bulk bins here.

Dates are rich in potassium, dietary fiber and tannins. Fiber is good for your gut and tannins help the body fight inflammation and infection. Dates are also rich in vitamin A and iron. The most amazing thing about dates is that they can be used to replace sugar in almost anything. I stopped using sweetened protein powders in my smoothies and now I use unsweetened ones but I add a few dates. This fudge requires no sugar because we fill it with dates — amazing, really!

Goji berries are a chinese herb (Gou Qi Zi). They are great for your blood. I prescribe them to some people with chronic pain in the legs and lower back. They are also good for men experiencing impotence and can be used to treat some eye problems. Women who are pregnant and people with intestinal issues should be careful not to eat too many gojis, but the amount in this fudge should be fine for anyone.

Cinnamon is one of the best herbs to warm the body. It’s great if you have a cold. If you are nauseous or have diarrhea, go for the cinnamon. It also gives you energy and helps with menstrual pain. Cinnamon is used in different forms in Chinese medicine: “gui zhi” is the cinnamon twig and “rou gui” is the cinnamon bark. Both are warming and are used for a variety of ailments. In the winter I add cinnamon to all sorts of foods. It helps with the common cold, swelling, various menstrual issues and some aches and pains. Be careful with it if you have a fever because it is so warming.

Maca Root is one of the superfoods I take every day. It has many healthy benefits including increasing libido, helping menopausal symptoms, relieving menstrual cramps, regulating hormones, and increasing energy.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Fudge (closer)-0044

 

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Fudge
Author: 
Recipe type: dessert, fudge
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 15-18 pieces
 
It's like a dream come true: fudge that will actually heal your body. And it tastes like real fudge. Amazing!
Ingredients
  • 1 15-oz can pumpkin puree
  • ¼ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup almond milk
  • 6 Tbs cashew butter
  • 2 Tbs peanut butter
  • 1 Tbs goji berries
  • 20 pitted dates
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 tsp maca root powder (optional)
  • For topping:
  • ¼ cup chopped pecans
  • 2 Tbs raisins
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients (through maca root powder) in a food processor and process until smooth.
  2. Pour into a parchment-lined loaf pan.
  3. Top with nuts and raisins.
  4. Let set in freezer at least a few hours or overnight.
  5. Cut into squares.
  6. Keep leftovers on a tray, covered in freezer.
  7. Enjoy!