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Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies

These Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies are so delicious… nobody will guess that they are grain-free and dairy-free!
flourless chocolate walnut cookies

I was never one of those people who had real true chocolate cravings. Honestly, I never understood it when people said they needed chocolate and they needed it fast. And then, last week, I had a chocolate craving… hmm. It wasn’t all-encompassing, but it was a definite strong desire for something chocolate. And nothing else would do. So, I looked through my recipes. What could I make that I had all of the ingredients on hand for? What could I make that was simple. I didn’t want to mess around with cake pans and pie tins.

I have a few cookies recipes on this site that I know will come out great every time I make them. My Flourless Chocolate Chip Walnut Cookies are my usual go-tos when I’m in a cookie mood. And I know my Grain-Free Oatmeal Raisin Cookies are awesome too. And then there’s my Grain-Free Peanut Butter Cookies… yum.

But nothing was chocolatey enough.

So, these Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies were born. Out of a chocolate need.

You should know, baking does not come naturally to me. It’s not like I have it in my skillset to just start creating a cookie recipe. I am not equipped with enough baking knowledge to know the ratios of flours to sugars to everything else. So, I started perusing my favorite food blogs to get some ideas.  I want to give thanks to Arman at The Big Mans World — I worked off of his ratios in his awesome recipe for Paleo Vegan Chocolate Hazelnut Cookies.

Maybe one day I’ll be able to experiment with cookie baking independently, but for now I’ll save the complete and total experimenting to my cooking and I’ll look to the experts for the baking… it certainly worked out well here in this recipe for Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies.

flourless chocolate walnut cookies

I learned long ago that my digestion runs so much better without any grains at all. If you think you are one of these people, I urge you to remove grains from your diet and see how you feel. Digestion is my baby — it’s what got me into this work. I wrote an ebook on it… you can download it below for free now.

Free healthy digestion ebookDownload my free ebook: Healthy Digestion Food Plan.

flourless chocolate walnut cookies

Here are some of the amazing healing ingredients in this recipe for Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies:

I used almond flour in this recipe. In Chinese medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten free and make the best grain free flour! Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation.

Raw cacao is a superfood. It is packed with magnesium, iron, zinc and other minerals. Not only is it packed with health benefits, but it actually has properties that help the body absorb nutrients better and it’s filled with antioxidants. Cacao can actually be translated as “food of the gods”… Raw cacao can help lower blood pressure, promote healthy heart function, improve digestion, and may even help increase the libido.

Sesame seeds have many great nutritional benefits. This recipe calls for tahini (sesame paste). These seeds are an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. Black sesame seeds are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This recipe uses tahini, which is a paste made from sesame seeds and oil (I buy this ready-made in a can or a jar).

Peanuts, contrary to what some believe, are actually good for many things in your body. I don’t often let myself eat them because they sometimes contain mold and it’s really hard to find reasonably priced organic healthy peanuts. But, these popular nuts are great for lessening edema; they act like a diuretic. They can also help you if you have insomnia or if you are breast feeding. An old-time remedy is to made peanut tea and drink it for bed to promote sleep. And, peanut shells used to be used to help with high blood pressure.

In Chinese medicine, we use coconut to strengthen the body, reduce swelling, and stop bleeding. Coconut kills viruses, bacteria, and parasites. It’s good for all types of infections and viruses in the body, including the flu, bronchitis, tapeworms, urinary tract infections, and herpes. And perhaps most importantly, it helps you keep your mind sharp and it makes it easier for you to focus. These cookies contain coconut flour, coconut oil, and coconut sugar.

flourless chocolate walnut cookies

Paleo Chocolate Walnut Cookies
Author: 
Recipe type: cookies, dessert, chocolate
Cuisine: grain free, gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 13
 
These Flourless Chocolate Walnut Cookies are the perfect grain-free dessert. They are delicious and they are good for you.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • ¼ cup coconut flour
  • ½ cup coconut sugar
  • 2 Tbsraw cacao powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ¼ cuptahini
  • ¼ cup peanut butter
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1 egg
  • 5 Tbs non-dairy milk (I used oat milk, but be aware that oats are a grain so if you want to keep these cookies completely grain-free, use almond milk, or hemp milk.)
  • 14 cup roughly chopped walnuts
  • ½ cup plus 2 Tbs dark chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, coconut sugar, cacao powder, and baking soda and whisk until well mixed.
  4. In a small bowl, stir together the tahini, peanut butter (I melted mine a bit in the microwave to make it easier), coconut oil, egg, and oat milk.
  5. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until just combined.
  6. Fold in the nuts and chocolate chips.
  7. Form the dough into golf-ball-size balls (I got 13 balls out of mine) and arrange them on the lined baking sheet, leaving as much space between them as possible. Gently press down to form cookies -- I used my fingers, but you can use the bottom of a glass or a fork.
  8. Bake 15 mins or until the edges are starting to crisp up a bit. Remove the pan to a rack to cool for a bit. Then, when the cookies are mostly cooked, use a spatula to place the individual cookies on the rack to cool. Eat some now and store the rest in a container in the fridge for later. Enjoy!

flourless chocolate walnut cookies

Beet Hummus

                           Beets are good for endurance and digestion!
beet hummus

I used to make homemade hummus all the time. I don’t know why I stopped, but stop I did. I think I forgot how easy it is to make it and how much better it tastes than those store-bought containers. But, let me tell you, it is easier to make homemade hummus than it is to go out to the store and buy it! And when you can add in your own flavors, there’s no need to ever buy it. Hmmmm…. I hope I remember this next time. Anyway, this Beet Hummus is delicious! And, look how pretty!

Long, long ago, when I would be preparing for a dinner party, I fixated on the appetizers. I would put out pretty platters of way too many finger foods and dips. I loved to make them and I loved the idea of eating all of my creations with awesome cocktails before dinner.

And everyone would be full before dinner.

Then I got smart. Nobody needs a boatload of appetizers if you are serving a delicious dinner. They may need the cocktails, but not all of that pre-dinner food.

So, now I pick one dip and maybe one finger food and I’m done… OK, so now I feel I have carte blanche to make way too many courses for the actual dinner… but it’s still better…

Last week, when I had some of my favorite people to dinner, I made 2 bowls of this beet hummus and served it with some divine breadsticks, some gluten-free chips, and some fresh carrots and radishes. Yum. That’s all I can say. Just yum.

And if you want a recipe for the best beet side dish ever, you have to try my Pomegranate Glazed Beets!

beet hummusbeet hummus

Here are some of the awesome healing ingredients in this beet hummus recipe:

Beets are SO good for you. I try to find ways to fit them into my meals as much as possible. Really… many times a week. Beets nourish blood and tonify the heart. Athletes are starting to drink beet juice as a form of endurance therapy. They are anti-carcinogenic, good for anemia, and relieve constipation. I also think it’s a great idea to eat them raw sometimes because their amazing goodness is even more pumped up this way.

Chickpeas actually help calm the spirit. They relieve anxiety and soothe irritability… it kind of makes you realize why hummus is so popular…

Sesame seeds have many great nutritional benefits. This recipe is made with tahini (sesame seed paste). They are an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use store-bought tahini.

Lemons are good for your stomach, they help detoxify your body, they balance your pH and they act as an antibacterial. If you have a sore throat or a cough, go for lemons to make things better. Lemons are great for quenching your thirst, and, in China, many years ago, hypertension was treated by drinking tea made from lemon peels.

beet hummus

Beet Hummus
Author: 
Recipe type: appetizer, dip, hummus
Cuisine: vegan, vegetarian, simple
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
This amazing beet hummus is so easy to make! You just toss everything in the food processor and it's done!
Ingredients
  • 3 medium red beets, peeled, quartered, and roasted until softened or 3 pre-cooked medium beets
  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • sea salt to taste
  • juice of 1 large lemon
  • 3 Tbs tahini
  • 3 Tbs water
Instructions
  1. Put all of the ingredients in the food processor and whiz it up until smooth!
  2. That's it! Enjoy!

beet hummus

Szechuan Zoodles

This recipe will actually make you feel cooler and calmer…

szechuan zoodles

It’s holiday season, but in my book that doesn’t mean everything we eat has to be heavy and traditional. This dish is neither, but it’s awesome. When I brought a big bowl of these Szechuan Zoodles to my family’s Hanukkah party, they certainly looked non-traditional next to the latkes but they made everyone happy. I’m all for healthy and happy, so if I were you, I’d give this dish a shot at your holiday party!

I saw this recipe on one of my favorite food blogs, Half Baked Harvest and the beautiful pics kind of called to me, so I knew I was going to have to make some version of them!

I’ve made zoodle dishes before and some have them have been great, while some have been only so-so. While I do love these vegetable noodles, I am a true pasta fanatic, so sometimes I end up a little disappointed. This dish is especially great because the zucchini noodles are mixed with buckwheat noodles, so in the end, this slurpy and spicy pasta dish tastes like real pasta. That’s always a really good thing…

And the dressing… OMG… it’s spicy and sweet and peanut buttery and it’s made in the blender… so it’s easy.

A real pasta dish that’s paleo, healing, spicy, slightly sweet, vibrant, and fresh… who could ask for anything more?

For another awesome paleo pasta dish try my recipe for Roasted Red Pepper Fettuccine.

szechuan zoodles

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in these Szechuan Zoodles:

Zucchini cools your body off and makes you feel better when you are feeling hot. It helps your body release excess heat and it will make your mind feel more calm.

Buckwheat is great to eat if you have diarrhea. It also helps lower blood pressure, stops some types of sweating, and has a good amount of vitamin E. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight cancer and heart disease.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use black or white seeds, or a combination of both.

Peanuts, contrary to what some believe, are actually good for many things in your body. I don’t often let myself eat them because they sometimes contain mold and it’s really hard to find reasonably priced organic healthy peanuts. But, these popular nuts are great for lessening edema; they act like a diuretic. They can also help you if you have insomnia or if you are breast feeding. An old-time remedy is to made peanut tea and drink it for bed to promote sleep. And, peanut shells used to be used to help with high blood pressure.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese Parsley. It is good for the common cold, indigestion, and energy flow in the body. An old Chinese remedy for the common cold and even for measles was to drink cilantro and mint tea. Cilantro is one of those herbs you either love or hate; I’m a lover…

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion.

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsicum. Capsicum actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

szechuan zoodles

Szechwan Zoodles
Author: 
Recipe type: zoodles, pasta, spaghetti, spicy, paleo, vegan, vegetarian, Asian
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Half Baked Harvest
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
This dish is made with zucchini noodles and buckwheat spaghetti. The sauce is the perfect combination of spicy and sweet! It's paleo, healthy, and comforting!
Ingredients
  • 20 oz zucchini noodles (I bought mine pre-zoodled, but I would guess 2 large zucchini would do the trick if you are spiralizing them yourself)
  • 1 lb buckwheat spaghetti, cooked al dente (I used these buckwheat/sweet potato ones)
  • ½ cup peanut butter (here's an organic one)
  • ½ cup tahini
  • ¼ cup liquid aminos (you can buy it here)
  • juice of 2 limes
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar (here's a good one)
  • 2 Tbs hot chili oil
  • 1 Tbs toasted sesame oil
  • ½ cup full-fat canned coconut milk
  • ¼ cup hot water
  • 1 cup chopped peanuts
  • ¼ cup sesame seeds (buy organic ones here)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 10 baby bell peppers, sliced
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 hot pepper, sliced
Instructions
  1. Boil the buckwheat noodles, just until they are cooked al dente.
  2. Drain them and run cold water over them while you toss them around with your hands to make sure they don't stick together.
  3. Place the buckwheat noodles and the zucchini noodles in a large bowl.
  4. Make the dressing: Put the peanut butter, tahini, aminos, lime juice, coconut sugar, chili oil, sesame oil, coconut milk, and ¼ cup hot water into your blender. Whiz it up until very creamy.
  5. Put the remaining ingredients into the bowl with the noodles.
  6. Add in as much dressing as you like and toss with your hands (you will probably have some extra dressing).
  7. Enjoy!

szechuan zoodles

Vegetable Hummus Dip

This vegetable hummus dip make store bought hummus taste incredible!

vegetable hummus dip

I love to entertain. The whole process de-stresses me. I’m not one of those people who sits around ruminating about what to serve and how to present it and how to time everything just right. I just kind of wing it. Easy entertaining is one of the things people ask me about all of the time. Well, this dip is for all of you who want a great easy entertaining recipe to serve your guests while you are getting dinner ready.

This recipe is like a “food hack”. What I mean by that is that it easily takes a store-bought ingredient and turns it into something super awesome. I mean really, really awesome. So-good-that-everyone-will-be-asking-you-for-the-recipe awesome.

The base of this vegetable hummus dip recipe is store-bought hummus. Add then we add a bunch of stuff to it. And we make it pretty. And we spice it up.  And serve it with beautiful crunchy vegetables for dipping. And amazing sprouted grain crackers. And it’s truly incredible.

I saw a version of this dip on one of my favorite blogs (Minimalist Baker) and I took some creative license and made it suit my needs. My guests loved it and I’ve made different versions of it many times since (even when I didn’t have any guests)… it’s really that good. I really feel like I’m spoiling myself when I make this just for my family.

If you are looking for another great use for chickpeas, try my Spicy Chickpea, Turkey, And Tomato Stew. 

vegetable hummus dipvegetable hummus dip

Here are some of the awesome healing ingredients in this vegetable hummus dip:

Chickpeas actually help calm the spirit. They relieve anxiety and soothe irritability… it kind of makes you realize why hummus is so popular…

Turmeric is a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Sesame seeds have many great nutritional benefits. They are an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. Black sesame seeds are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This recipe uses tahini sauce, which is a paste made from sesame seeds and oil (I buy this read-made in a can or a jar).

Parsley has been shown to reduce tumors in the lungs and to neutralize the effects of carcinogens, including cigarette smoke. It is high in vitamins A and C, and is good for your heart. This herb is also a natural breath freshener. So, if you have a chance to use more than a few sprigs as a garnish, go for it.

Scallions, as I tell you often, are one of my favorites. In Chinese medicine, the root of the scallion is a healing herb (Cong Bai). I always keep scallions on hand in my refrigerator so that I can whip up a batch of cold and flu fighting tea (scallion roots and ginger) the second anyone feels that scratchy throat coming on. It helps the body sweat out toxins. Scallions are antiviral and antibacterial; they are good for the common cold and general nasal congestion — just don’t eat too many if you have a fever.

Dill is considered a chemoprotective herb that can help neutralize some carcinogens and it’s also an antibacterial herb.

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to aid in digestion and to help detoxify the body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

vegetable hummus dip

Vegetable Hummus Dip
Author: 
Recipe type: appetizer, dip, easy entertaining, Greek, Mediterranean
Cuisine: Recipe adapted from:Minimalist Baker
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
This is the perfect easy-entertaining dip. It takes store-bought hummus to amazing new heights. And it's healing and delicious and so pretty...
Ingredients
  • 1 15-oz can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1-tsp for the veg salad topping
  • 1 tsp coconut sugar
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ¾ tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 10 grinds of black pepper
  • 1 cup store-bought hummus
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • juice of ½ a lemon, plus a bit extra for the veg salad topping
  • ¼ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 tsp minced fresh dill
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 20 grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 scallion, sliced
  • hot sauce, for garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Combine the chickpeas in a small bowl with the oil, coconut sugar, smoked paprika, cumin, turmeric, oregano, salt, and pepper.
  3. Spread them out on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  4. Roast in the oven until the chickpeas are beginning to brown and get a bit crispy (mine took about 35 minutes).
  5. Meanwhile, make the sauce: stir together the tahini, lemon juice, almond milk, dill, and garlic. Set aside.
  6. Make the salad for the top: In a small bowl, combine the parsley, tomatoes, scallion, 1-tsp of olive oil and a quick squeeze of lemon juice.
  7. Spread the hummus on a serving platter.
  8. Top with the tahini sauce mixture and the vegetable salad.
  9. Garnish with a bit of hot sauce if you like.
  10. Serve with crackers and/or fresh vegetables to dip.

vegetable hummus dip