Posts

How To Fight Seasonal Allergies With Food and Herbs

You can fight seasonal allergies with food and herbs… and you can win this fight! You often hear me say that food is medicine… but food is also the best allergy medicine! Read more

Sweet And Spicy Chicken Drumsticks

These sweet and spicy chicken drumsticks are a go-to recipe in my house — ball games, picnics, pig-outs… Read more

17 Foods To Boost Your Mood

It’s pretty awesome that there are foods you can eat to elevate your mood. It’s true that food really IS medicine! The next time you need a little mood boost or emotional pick-me-up, pull out this list of 17 Foods To Boost Your Mood… Read more

Buckwheat Ramen Soup

buckwheat ramen soup

What is it about ramen that makes it so good that I will eat it even on a hot summer day? I mean, usually, if you told me I was going to have hot soup for dinner in August, I’d run the other way. But not with ramen. It’s just so good! And this buckwheat ramen soup is one of my all-time favorite recipes.

I like to eat grain-free whenever possible. I also love pasta and noodles of all kinds. Now, I could make this soup using all different types of vegetable noodles, like zucchini, carrot, parsnip, etc. This recipe from feedfeed is awesome if you want to give the veggie noodle ramen a try. The buckwheat ramen noodles that are available in stores now are amazing, so I say give this a try! It’s close to real, authentic ramen noodles.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, buckwheat (despite its name) is not a grain, it’s a seed. So, it’s like hitting the jackpot with these packaged noodles.

The other day, my niece was coming over for dinner. I didn’t give this dinner any thought at all during the day. Then, all of a sudden, at about 4pm, I realized I better make sure I have the ingredients to make something. Anything edible would do. I looked in my pantry, and saw a package of buckwheat ramen noodles. And, I have to tell you that even though it’s hot here in New York in August, nobody complained — it was the perfect dinner.

I served the hot bowls of ramen with cold old-fashioned tomato sandwiches. Can I just say, this was an amazing dinner. So, I’m telling you that you have to make this buckwheat ramen soup. And soon. Don’t wait til winter.

And, if you want another great summer noodle dish, try my recipe for Szechuan Zoodles.

buckwheat ramen soup

There are a bunch of great healing ingredients in this buckwheat ramen soup:

Buckwheat is great to eat if you have diarrhea. It also helps lower blood pressure, stops some types of sweating, and has a good amount of vitamin E. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight cancer and heart disease. Buckwheat is a seed, not a grain, so no inflammation here!

Ginger is a Chinese herb (Sheng Jiang). It’s especially good during cold weather and also during seasonal changes. So, when winter is trying to turn into spring, and we (those of us on the east coast) get some of those cold, raw, damp days, ginger will make you feel better and will help boost your immune system. Ginger is also great for some digestive issues. Old folklore shows that ginger was rubbed on scalps to stop baldness. And, in some circles, a ginger paste is still rubbed on arthritic joints to stop pain (don’t try this at home unless you are diagnosed with a cold-condition by an acupuncturist).

In Eastern medicine, bok choy is used to quench thirst, aid digestion, prevent constipation and treat diabetes. It is rich in vitamin C, beta-carotene, folate and fiber. And there are only 20 calories in one cup of Bok Choy. So, it’s good for you, it’s easy to prepare, and it tastes good.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people. I used a hot pepper sauce in this recipe (Sriracha) and I added some sliced jalapeños at the end — do whatever makes you happy!

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

Carrots help strengthen the organs in your body. They also are good for the eyes (this is their claim to fame) and they promote healthy digestion. Many moons ago, people used to make carrot tea to ward off measles and to prevent cancer. Carrots help detoxify the body and in today’s world of Chinese medicine, they are prescribed to ease constipation and tonsillitis.

Onions are great for your immune system; they are a natural antihistamine. In the winter, I eat lots and lots of onions… I guess I should feel sorry for the people close to me! Recently, I recommended that a patient with bronchitis put sliced raw onions in her socks when she went to sleep… she woke up so much better; they actually can rid the body of bacteria. (I know I’ve told you this before, but it really is awesome!) Onion is a superhero in the food world!

buckwheat ramen soup

Buckwheat Ramen Soup
Author: 
Recipe type: soup, ramen, lunch, dinner, main course
Cuisine: Asian, vegetarian, grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free, healthy
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Buckwheat ramen noodles are genius! This ramen soup has everything you want, but none of the usual grains or gluten. This is comfort in a bowl... and so healthy!
Ingredients
  • 4 eggs, boiled for 5 minutes, then cooled in ice water for awhile, then peeled and cut in half
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • sea salt
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 Tbs yellow miso
  • 1 tsp grated ginger
  • ½ tsp sriracha sauce
  • 7 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 Tbs white vinegar
  • 1 large head of bok choy, cut into ½-inch wide strips
  • 3 Tbs liquid aminos
  • 1 cup shredded or spiralized carrots
  • 3 buckwheat ramen noodle cakes
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, sliced (optional garnish)
Instructions
  1. In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat and add the onions. Sprinkle with a little sea salt.
  2. Saute about 5 minutes, or until the onions start to brown.
  3. Add the garlic, miso, and ginger. Cook, stirring about 1 minute.
  4. Stir in the sriracha and cook for about 30 seconds.
  5. Add the vinegar, and use it to deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits from the bottom of the pan.
  6. Add the broth, bok choy, carrots, and aminos.
  7. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, until the bok choy is slightly tender, about 15 minutes.
  8. Turn the heat back up to medium-high and add the buckwheat ramen noodles, poking them with a fork or tongs to break them up. Cook, stirring occasionally, just until the noodles are al dente (about 4 minutes). NOTE: Do not overcook these noodles, or they may become gummy!
  9. Ladle the soup into bowls, and top each bowl with 2 egg halves and a few slices of jalapeños.
  10. Enjoy!

buckwheat ramen soup

Szechuan Zoodles

This recipe will actually make you feel cooler and calmer…

szechuan zoodles

It’s holiday season, but in my book that doesn’t mean everything we eat has to be heavy and traditional. This dish is neither, but it’s awesome. When I brought a big bowl of these Szechuan Zoodles to my family’s Hanukkah party, they certainly looked non-traditional next to the latkes but they made everyone happy. I’m all for healthy and happy, so if I were you, I’d give this dish a shot at your holiday party!

I saw this recipe on one of my favorite food blogs, Half Baked Harvest and the beautiful pics kind of called to me, so I knew I was going to have to make some version of them!

I’ve made zoodle dishes before and some have them have been great, while some have been only so-so. While I do love these vegetable noodles, I am a true pasta fanatic, so sometimes I end up a little disappointed. This dish is especially great because the zucchini noodles are mixed with buckwheat noodles, so in the end, this slurpy and spicy pasta dish tastes like real pasta. That’s always a really good thing…

And the dressing… OMG… it’s spicy and sweet and peanut buttery and it’s made in the blender… so it’s easy.

A real pasta dish that’s paleo, healing, spicy, slightly sweet, vibrant, and fresh… who could ask for anything more?

For another awesome paleo pasta dish try my recipe for Roasted Red Pepper Fettuccine.

szechuan zoodles

Here are some of the great healing ingredients in these Szechuan Zoodles:

Zucchini cools your body off and makes you feel better when you are feeling hot. It helps your body release excess heat and it will make your mind feel more calm.

Buckwheat is great to eat if you have diarrhea. It also helps lower blood pressure, stops some types of sweating, and has a good amount of vitamin E. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight cancer and heart disease.

Sesame seeds (the black ones) are a Chinese herb (Hei Zhi Ma). Black foods, in Chinese medicine, are knows as longevity foods. This herb is good for so many things, including headaches, constipation, dizziness, and even helping with lactation. White sesame seeds also have many great nutritional benefits. They are also an anti-aging food. If you have backaches, hair thats graying way too fast, ringing in the ears, weak knees, blurry vision or general weakness, go for the sesame seeds; just sprinkle them on everything. Long ago in China, sesame seeds were ground into honey to form a paste and was taken as a medicine to counter old-age and weakness. For this recipe, you can use black or white seeds, or a combination of both.

Peanuts, contrary to what some believe, are actually good for many things in your body. I don’t often let myself eat them because they sometimes contain mold and it’s really hard to find reasonably priced organic healthy peanuts. But, these popular nuts are great for lessening edema; they act like a diuretic. They can also help you if you have insomnia or if you are breast feeding. An old-time remedy is to made peanut tea and drink it for bed to promote sleep. And, peanut shells used to be used to help with high blood pressure.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese Parsley. It is good for the common cold, indigestion, and energy flow in the body. An old Chinese remedy for the common cold and even for measles was to drink cilantro and mint tea. Cilantro is one of those herbs you either love or hate; I’m a lover…

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion.

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsicum. Capsicum actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

szechuan zoodles

Szechwan Zoodles
Author: 
Recipe type: zoodles, pasta, spaghetti, spicy, paleo, vegan, vegetarian, Asian
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Half Baked Harvest
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
This dish is made with zucchini noodles and buckwheat spaghetti. The sauce is the perfect combination of spicy and sweet! It's paleo, healthy, and comforting!
Ingredients
  • 20 oz zucchini noodles (I bought mine pre-zoodled, but I would guess 2 large zucchini would do the trick if you are spiralizing them yourself)
  • 1 lb buckwheat spaghetti, cooked al dente (I used these buckwheat/sweet potato ones)
  • ½ cup peanut butter (here's an organic one)
  • ½ cup tahini
  • ¼ cup liquid aminos (you can buy it here)
  • juice of 2 limes
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar (here's a good one)
  • 2 Tbs hot chili oil
  • 1 Tbs toasted sesame oil
  • ½ cup full-fat canned coconut milk
  • ¼ cup hot water
  • 1 cup chopped peanuts
  • ¼ cup sesame seeds (buy organic ones here)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 10 baby bell peppers, sliced
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 hot pepper, sliced
Instructions
  1. Boil the buckwheat noodles, just until they are cooked al dente.
  2. Drain them and run cold water over them while you toss them around with your hands to make sure they don't stick together.
  3. Place the buckwheat noodles and the zucchini noodles in a large bowl.
  4. Make the dressing: Put the peanut butter, tahini, aminos, lime juice, coconut sugar, chili oil, sesame oil, coconut milk, and ¼ cup hot water into your blender. Whiz it up until very creamy.
  5. Put the remaining ingredients into the bowl with the noodles.
  6. Add in as much dressing as you like and toss with your hands (you will probably have some extra dressing).
  7. Enjoy!

szechuan zoodles

Turmeric Chicken

Turmeric is so healing, so why not use it whenever you can? This turmeric chicken is a crowd-pleaser… it’s so good!

turmeric chicken

Every year there are a few foods that just seem to show up everywhere. Last year it was kale. There were kale salads, kale pestos, kale smoothies… And while I was starting to feel a little “kale-ed out”, I do still make some of these recipes, because, well, they are just plain good!

This recipe has no kale in it… It’s an organic, grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free meal that will reduce inflammation in your body. And, the colors are bright and vibrant. So, if you eat with your eyes first like I do, you will be smiling even before you take the first bite.

This year, turmeric seems to be the “it ingredient”. And it’s an awesome ingredient at that! For years, I’ve been using turmeric to heal inflammation in the body. I bet you didn’t know that turmeric is actually a Chinese herb! (See below and I’ll explain it to you.) I’ve always loved adding turmeric to my smoothies and to pots of chili and to my curries, but now I’m expanding my use of this awesome herb into more everyday-type recipes. This chicken is one of them. Really, it’s simple pan-roasted chicken with a great turmeric sauce. It tastes a little Chinese, a little Indian, and a lot delicious!

You can make this turmeric chicken recipe mild or spicy. I made mine fairly spicy, mainly because my son was coming for dinner and he likes everything ridiculously spicy… I served it with a grain-free garlicky fettuccine and it was just perfect. I made enough so that there are plenty of leftovers in the fridge, which worked out really well because leftover chicken is just awesome for lunch during the week!

If you are looking for more recipes using turmeric, here’s one of my favorite smoothie recipes: Pineapple Turmeric Smoothie.

turmeric chickenturmeric chicken

Here are some of the reasons this recipe is so awesome:

Turmeric is actually a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Chicken is something I push people to buy organic if possible. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery or childbirth. People who have some conditions that we consider “excess heat” conditions should limit the amount of chicken they eat. So, if you have an illness that gives you a bright red tongue or severe dryness in your body, check with your doctor first. For example, if you have a lot of burning stomach acid, you should avoid chicken for awhile…

In Asian medicine, we use coconut to strengthen the body, reduce swelling, and stop bleeding. Coconut kills viruses, bacteria, and parasites. It’s good for all types of infections and viruses in the body, including the flu, bronchitis, tapeworms, urinary tract infections, and herpes. The creamy sauce in this turmeric chicken recipe is made with coconut milk, making it taste rich while healing you!

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

Vinegar has anti-bacterial capabilities, can help speed up circulation, reduce blood clots, and can help with post-partum dizziness.

turmeric chicken

Turmeric Chicken
Author: 
Recipe type: chicken, one-pan meal
Cuisine: Indian, Asian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
This chicken is warming, healing, simple, and delicious... and it's made in one-pan!
Ingredients
  • 8 bone-in organic chicken thighs
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 2 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk
  • ¼ cup liquid aminos
  • 1 Tbs turmeric
  • ⅓ cup white vinegar
  • 6 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 lge hot red pepper, sliced (or to taste)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 15 grinds of black pepper
Instructions
  1. Season the chicken with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat the oil in a large pan over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and brown on both sides. (Mine took about 10 minutes on each side.)
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the coconut milk, liquid aminos, turmeric, and vinegar.
  4. When the chicken is browned, pour the coconut milk mixture into the spaces between the chicken. (I prefer not to pour it directly on top of the chicken so that it stays crispier.)
  5. Add the garlic, pepper slices, and bay leaf to the sauce in between the chicken.
  6. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan, and let simmer for about 35 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. Then, remove the cover and let the sauce boil a bit to thicken, about 5 minutes.
  7. Enjoy!

turmeric chicken

Spicy Crispy Chicken

Spicy crispy chicken is a staple in my house. It’s one of those recipes that pleases everyone!

Crispy Spicy Chicken

We are doing a detox in my house. After a full month of parties, vacations, and celebrations, we are actually looking forward to it! It’s funny, when I just wrote that sentence I realized that while we did celebrate more than usual this month, really a lot of our overeating  was done at home when not celebrating… ugh! It’s time to stop!!!!

But, in our house, a detox doesn’t mean green juices all day long (although I do love my green juice…). For the month of January, we are eliminating all grains, sweeteners, beans, and a long list of other things our bodies feel better without.

Nobody really knows they are detoxing because recipes like this spicy crispy chicken are on our eating plan.  And for the rest of this month, you will see plenty of other great recipes that fit into our elimination diet.

Just look at this picture — can you believe this is a healthy recipe that would fit into an elimination diet? Well, it is… and it tastes even better than it looks!  And, if you are looking for a simple salad to go perfectly with this dish, try my Romaine Wedge Salad.

This chicken is really crispy (my son thought it was fried) and you can adjust the spiciness to your particular taste. For my son, I dipped the chicken fully into the amazing spicy/sweet sauce and really rolled it around so it was extra spicy. For the rest of us, I drizzled it on top or left it on the side for awesome dipping.

Crispy Spicy Chicken (sauce bowl in hand)

Let’s get cooking and get back to feeling healthier:

Chicken is something I always buy organic. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery, childbirth, or illness. Chicken is good for nourishing the blood and it’s a healthy source of protein and vitamin B6.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. Whenever I have a cold I eat lots of hot sauce. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot sauce you like. Read the ingredients on the label (as with any pre-made food) to make sure it meets your dietary requirements — there are so many hot sauces, wing sauces, and barbecue sauces out there that are gluten-free, paleo, etc. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

Tapioca is a starch that comes from the cassava plant. It’s not really a flour in the traditional sense; it’s grain and gluten free. It’s good for your circulation and your digestion. Oftentimes I will make recipes with tapioca flour — it seems to crisp things up well — it certainly works well on this chicken.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. Sometimes it can even be used topically on skin disorders. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc…. When I have a cold I will actually make a garlic concoction in my blender and drink it — it works wonders!

Strawberries are good for your heart and they are great at reducing plaque in your mouth. They will make you feel better if you have an annoying dry cough or if you feel bloated from eating too much…

If you know me, you know I almost always add raw Chinese herbs to my sauces while they are cooking. This time I added some Bai Zhu. Bai Zhu can be good if you are feeling run down and bloated (and I am!).

Spicy Crispy Chicken

Spicy Crispy Chicken
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree, Chicken, Dinner, Poultry
Cuisine: inspired by: Host The Toast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
This chicken is so crispy that it tastes fried -- but it's not. The spicy sauce has a sweetness from strawberries -- this is amazing and simple and healthy!
Ingredients
  • 8 boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1 cup tapioca flour (you can buy it here)
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Raw Chinese herbs (optional) (I used Bai Zhu)
  • For sauce:
  • ½ cup hot sauce or Buffalo wing sauce (these are my favorite hot sauces)
  • 3 tsp minced garlic
  • ¼ cup vegetable or chicken broth
  • ½ cup strawberry preserves (I use this one)
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Convection setting, or 425 regular bake setting.
  2. Line a baking sheet with foil and place a rack on top of the foil.
  3. In a pie plate or shallow bowl, mix together the tapioca flour, a generous amount of salt and pepper, smoked paprika, turmeric, and cayenne. Stir until mixed.
  4. Pour the oil into a second dish.
  5. Dip each piece of chicken into the oil and flip over until coated, then dip into the flour mixture.
  6. Place the pieces as they are dredged onto the rack.
  7. Bake the chicken until it's crispy and cooked through. Mine took 35 minutes on the Convection setting.
  8. Meanwhile, make the sauce by stirring the ingredients in a small pot and then letting it simmer for about 20 minutes.
  9. Remove the chicken from the oven and either coat in the sauce or pass the sauce on the side. Enjoy!

Spicy Crispy Chicken

Chicken Sandwich With Mango Salsa

This chicken sandwich with mango salsa can be made with leftover chicken or store-bought rotisserie chicken!

Chicken Tartine With Mango Salsa-0292

Last week when I discovered the wonders of cooking a whole chicken in my slow cooker (get the recipe here), I had the good fortune of having so much delicious shredded chicken left over that I was able to make the best sandwiches.

Sandwiches always excite everyone in my house. I mean, really, anything between bread is good… but part of the excitement is due to the fact that I almost never make them… absence makes the heart grow fonder I guess…

I don’t eat a lot of bread, so I made these pretty little open-faced sandwiches.

This chicken sandwich with mango salsa is a great recipe to make with leftover homemade chicken or with the chicken from a store-bought rotisserie chicken.

It’s so pretty.

It tastes yummy.

It’s really good for you.

And, you can customize these beauties any way you like. I wanted a little spice so I used jalapeños and radishes. I wanted a little sweetness, so I made some mango salsa. And, let me tell you, this was the perfect combination!

Chicken Tartine (in hand)-0349

Here are the healthy ingredients I used:

Chicken is something I always buy organic. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery or childbirth. People who have some conditions that we consider “excess heat” conditions should limit the amount of chicken they eat. So, if you have an illness that gives you a bright red tongue or severe dryness in your body, check with your doctor first.

Radishes are good for your tissues, blood vessels, teeth and bones. They also can help regulate your blood pressure and can ease the symptoms of asthma and other respiratory ailments. In this tartine, they also add a good amount of crunch and peppery bite.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsicum. Capsicum actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese Parsley. It is good for the common cold, indigestion, and energy flow in the body. An old Chinese remedy for the common cold and even for measles was to drink cilantro and mint tea. Cilantro is one of those herbs you either love or hate; I’m a lover…

Mangos are great for digestion and they help if you have one of those annoying dry coughs that just won’t go away. This delicious fruit will also help strengthen your bones and is good for your heart.

Chicken Tartine (single)-0329

Chicken Sandwich With Mango Salsa
Author: 
Recipe type: sandwich, lunch
Cuisine: american, french
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2 to 4
 
This pretty open-faced sandwich is perfect to make with leftover chicken or with a store-bought rotisserie chicken. It's spicy and sweet and juicy and so good!
Ingredients
  • about 2 cups of cooked, shredded chicken
  • 4 radishes, thinly sliced
  • 1 serrano pepper, thinly sliced
  • ⅓ cup cilantro leaves
  • sea salt and black pepper to taste (this is the fine sea salt I just bought)
  • 4 slices pure rye bread (or your healthy bread of choice)
  • For mango salsa:
  • 1 mango, peeled and cut into chunks
  • juice of 1 lime
  • ¼ tsp dried hot red pepper flakes
  • ½ tsp avocado oil (or healthy oil of your choice)
  • tiny pinch of sea salt
Instructions
  1. Put all of the salsa ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Set aside.
  2. Toast the bread if you like, and cut each slice in half diagonally.
  3. Divide the chicken, radishes, hot pepper slices, and cilantro among the slices of bread. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Drizzle with mango salsa.
  5. Enjoy!

Chicken Sandwich With Mango Salsa