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Broccoli Pizza Crust

Did you know that  eating broccoli can make you feel less irritable…?

broccoli pizza crust Pizza can be a girl’s best friend. Yes, I said it. And I meant it. And no, you won’t be the first non-believer. If I had a nickel for every person who thinks I can’t make my favorite comfort foods both delicious and healthy, I’d be rich. It’s true that I try not to eat grains, and I don’t eat cheese. But, it is also awesome-ly true that I make the best healthy pizza around. So, for all of my friends out there who are working with me to get your-over-40-amazing-selves energized and healthy… this broccoli pizza crust recipe is for you.

There’s nothing sexier than a woman eating pizza. Except maybe if she’s slurping up a big bowl of spaghetti…

I mean, who doesn’t love a woman who can eat?

Eating a salad just doesn’t have the same appeal. But eating pizza with your hands… that’s a beautiful sight!

At least, that’s what I’ve been told. Then again, I have to remain open to the possibility that I’ve been told that because in my younger days I was able to eat an entire full-size pizza all by myself. I could probably still do it now, but I’ve got more sense. Or more control. Or more… something.

Anyway, this broccoli pizza crust is awesome.

I’ve made my share of grain-free pizza crusts. This one is great. It gets crisp enough so that you can hold a slice in your hands without it drooping all over the place. And it has a nice cheesy taste, but there’s no cheese. And I even like the green color. And once you top it with your awesome toppings, it’s drool-worthy.

If you love broccoli, you should also try my Chopped Broccoli Salad recipe.

broccoli pizza crust

Here are some of the healing powers of this broccoli crust pizza topped with my toppings:

Broccoli has a lot of potassium and is great for brain function; it also has magnesium and calcium to help regulate blood pressure. It’s also good to clear your body of excess heat and it actually can help your vision too. I love foods that make you feel better mentally as well as physically, and broccoli is one of those foods — it can lessen feelings of irritability.

Nutritional yeast gives things a cheese-y taste without using any dairy and it adds amino acids and Vitamin B, iron, zinc, and selenium to your diet. Nutritional yeast is a complete protein and also contains fiber, so it’s a really good thing!

I am a big proponent of eating the whole egg. So many of the nutrients and the taste are in the yolk; I’ll never understand separating nature’s perfect food. Eggs help with many types of dryness in the body. If you have a dry cough or a frog-in-your-throat, try eating some eggs. They have also been shown to help women with various conditions during and after pregnancy. Some people consider eggs to be a superfood. They contain a large amount of vitamins A and B and are a great source of protein. Eggs sometimes get a bad rap because of cholesterol, but it’s been shown that in 70% of people, eggs do not raise cholesterol, so don’t assume they are bad for you. Buy organic eggs and you are really doing the right thing.

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc…. Research also shows that garlic may be a great herb to ward off cancer, and also to lower cholesterol. I know several moms who put a few drops of garlic oil into their child’s ear to get rid of an ear infection — this is one multitasking herb!

broccoli pizza crustbroccoli pizza crust

Broccoli Pizza Crust
Author: 
Recipe type: paleo, whole30, vegetarian, comfort food
Cuisine: Italian, pizza
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2
 
This pizza is grain-free and dairy-free. Follow this recipe for an awesome crust, and feel free to vary the toppings to your liking... after all, a good pizza should make you smile!
Ingredients
  • For crust:
  • 20 oz fresh broccoli florets
  • ½ cup nutritional yeast (I like this kind)
  • 1 cup shredded vegan Parmesan cheese (or you can substitute regular Parmesan)
  • 4 eggs
  • Here's what I topped my crust with:
  • Fresh Basil, sliced and whole leaves
  • vegan mozzarella cheese, cubed
  • pizza sauce (here's an organic one, but it's a bit pricey, so use whatever you like)
  • fresh minced garlic
  • grape tomatoes, halved
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 425°F.
  2. Spread the broccoli florets out onto a parchment-lined baking tray.
  3. Roast in the oven for 20-mins.
  4. Remove from the oven and let cool for a few minutes.
  5. Transfer the roasted broccoli to a food processor and pulse it 10 times or until the broccoli is finely minced.
  6. Transfer the minced broccoli to a large bowl and stir in the nutritional yeast, Parmesan, and eggs. Mush it up good with your hands so it's well-combined.
  7. Split this broccoli dough in half, and form each one into a ball.
  8. Place each ball onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and press into an 11-inch roundish circle, about ¼-inch thick.
  9. Bake 20 minutes.
  10. Remove from oven and, using the parchment paper as an aid, lift the crust on the paper and then carefully flip it onto another piece of parchment paper, put it back on the sheet, and then back into the oven for 15 minutes, or until the edges are starting to crisp up a bit.
  11. Remove from oven and top with a little pizza sauce (you will only want to use about ¼ cup), minced garlic, tomatoes, and vegan cheese.
  12. Bake an additional 15 minutes.
  13. Remove from the oven and top with fresh basil.
  14. Slice and serve.
  15. Enjoy!

broccoli pizza crust

Paleo Eggplant Meatballs

Here’s a meatball that can reduce inflammation… really!
paleo eggplant meatballs

Food in “ball” form is just fun. But, then again, I think finger food and appetizers just taste better than big portions of food. It just tastes does. It’s like food on a stick — when my kids were young, I’d cut up whatever I was serving for dinner and stack ( the bites on toothpicks; it worked like a charm. Meatballs are awesome (and don’t require any sticks). These paleo eggplant meatballs have no meat in them. They taste like little bites of eggplant parmesan. But, this recipe contains no grains and no cheese. And no, they don’t taste like air or like cardboard (as I have been asked by some doubter-friends).

I served these meatless balls for dinner the other night on top of my favorite grain-free fettuccine and my favorite marinara sauce.

The next day, I ate some for lunch on top of a salad with a vegan Caesar dressing — this was so good!

And, truth be told, the rest of the batch was eaten straight from the container in the fridge, without even heating them up. And yup, I liked them this way too.

The original recipe for these paleo eggplant meatballs is from a great blog called Every Last Bite.  I’m addicted.

Next up, I’ll be making these balls into burgers. Hmmmm, I think topped with some caramelized onions and vegan cheese… OK, now I’m hungry. Again.

I’m on a big customized-recipe-creation kick right now (okay… always…), so let me customize a recipe for you that will work for whatever’s going on in your body now… I’m such a geek that I really do get excited about doing this. I’ve got a meatball recipe with your name on it…  So CLICK HEREto be taken directly into my calendar to sign up for your free phone consultation.

If you are looking for another great paleo eggplant recipe, try my Paleo Eggplant Parmesan.

paleo eggplant meatballspaleo eggplant meatballs

Here are just a few reasons to make these paleo eggplant meatballs:

In eastern medicine, eggplant is added to the diet when there is pain in the body because it’s great for relieving pain and reducing swelling. It’s especially good to eat eggplant when you are experiencing some nasty digestive issues. It relieves stomach pain, helps with dysentery, diarrhea, and painful urinary conditions. Eggplant has also been used topically to treat frostbite and canker sores… talk about a multi-tasking vegetable…

Onions are great for your immune system; they are a natural antihistamine. In the winter, I eat lots and lots of onions… I guess I should feel sorry for the people close to me! During cold and flu season, I recommend onions to everyone, and in lots of ways and forms; they actually can rid the body of bacteria.

In Asian medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten-free. Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation. This recipe uses almond flour to hold the balls together.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects. In these meatballs, I used dried basil, but please feel free to add some fresh basil too.

paleo eggplant meatballs

If you make this Paleo Eggplant Meatballs recipe, please be sure to let me know in the comments below. I love hearing how you like a recipe, and I love to answer your questions! If you make it, be sure to take a photo and tag me and post it on Instagram.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Paleo Eggplant Meatballs
Author: 
Recipe type: meatballs, vegetarian, grain-free, paleo, Italian
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Every Last Bite
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
These are meatless meatballs that won't make you miss the meat. Wow, that's a mouthful... and these are deliciously healthy mouthfuls!
Ingredients
  • 1 medium/large eggplant, diced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 5 large garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 1 cup almond flour (I buy mine by the case, here)
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • ½ cup vegan Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • 1 egg white, beaten with a fork
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
  3. Place the eggplant, onion, and garlic on the baking tray and toss with the oil and a bit of salt and pepper.
  4. Roast in the oven for about 45 minutes, or until you start to see some charred edges.
  5. Remove from oven and now reduce the oven temp to 375°F.
  6. Scrape the roasted veggies into a food processor. Pulse 10 times -- you want there to still be some chunks in the mixture.
  7. Transfer the veggie mixture to a large bowl and stir in the almond flour, basil, Parmesan and egg white. Combine well.
  8. Roll into golf ball - size balls. (I found it easier to do this with wet hands).
  9. Arrange the balls on the baking tray (use the same piece of parchment paper).
  10. Bake for about 50 minutes, without turning the balls over. You will know they are done when they release from the parchment paper without sticking. Make sure you let the balls cool before you try to release them completely; this will help them release more easily without sticking.
  11. Enjoy your balls with your favorite pasta, sauce, salad, sandwich...

paleo eggplant meatballs

Paleo Eggplant Parmesan

Eggplant reduces pain and inflammation… I know that my over 40 body (okay… waaaayyyy over 40) needs that… don’t you?

paleo eggplant parmesan

Eggplant parmesan is one of my all-time favorite comfort foods. I have tried, and failed, to make a delicious, healthy, paleo, vegan, grain-free version for so long that I can’t even remember when this obsession started. But today, I can finally say: TA-DA! I did it. This paleo eggplant parmesan is perfect. For real. And not just by my ridiculously healthy standards. But by everyone’s standards.

And now I feel unstoppable. Because I am going to be making zucchini parmesan next. And who knows what will follow.

I think the artwork hanging in my kitchen helped me with this recipe. I mean, when you look at a colorful canvass of The Hulk smashing rocks, it kind of makes you feel all-powerful. Or, maybe it was the awesome paleo wine that I was sipping. But, what-evuh…

The eggplant in this dish is thinly sliced and crispy with a deliciously traditional texture. The sauce is a little sweet and a little spicy and it screams Southern Italy. The cheese is vegan, but I’ve found the most delicious vegan mozzarella ever, so even this part of the dish passed muster by my non-vegan, and often overly-critical, family.

Here in New York, it’s cold and it’s damp. And it’s dark out at 4:30. Wow, do I hate these short days. But let me say, that a big dish of this paleo eggplant parmesan just makes it all right. I think it even tastes better on these cold, dark, and dreary days…

For another great eggplant dish, try my recipe for Vegan Fettuccine Bolognese.

paleo eggplant parmesanpaleo eggplant parmesan

Here are some of the reasons you need to make this paleo eggplant parmesan:

In eastern medicine, eggplant is added to the diet when there is pain in the body because it’s great for relieving pain and reducing swelling. It’s especially good to eat eggplant when you are experiencing some nasty digestive issues. It relieves stomach pain, helps with dysentery, diarrhea, and painful urinary conditions. Eggplant has also been used topically to treat frostbite and canker sores… talk about a multi-tasking vegetable…

In Asian medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten-free. Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation. This recipe uses almond flour to coat the eggplant slices. This makes for a healthy, crispy coating.

Oregano is a powerful antioxidant and it is great at fighting bacteria. It’s also known as an herb that brings joy and happiness to people. I even just bought a bottle of oregano essential oil and I put a drop in our smoothies or water when anyone has a cold… it works great!

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to aid in digestion and to help detoxify the body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections. The tomato sauce in this recipe is delicious, so I suggest making double the amount so you can freeze a batch.

paleo eggplant parmesan

Paleo Eggplant Parmesan
Author: 
Recipe type: casserole, paleo, vegan, dairy-free, grain-free, comfort food
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6
 
This dish tastes just as good as a traditional, non-healthy, great eggplant parmesan. But this one's paleo and vegan. This is my favorite creation yet!
Ingredients
  • 3 medium thin eggplants (I used some Japanese ones), sliced thin vertically (so you end up with long, thin slices)
  • 2 Tbs flax meal whisked into 6 Tbs water (or substitute 2 eggs, beaten and mixed with 2 Tbs water)
  • 1-1/2 cups almond meal
  • 1-1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 1 28-oz can crushed tomatoes
  • ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1-1/2 Tbs coconut sugar
  • 4 oz thinly sliced vegan mozzarella cheese
  • ¼ cup vegan Parmesan cheese shreds
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Place the egg and water mixture into a shallow pie plate or dish.
  3. In a second shallow dish, combine the almond meal with the oregano and some salt and black pepper.
  4. Dip each eggplant slice in the egg mixture and flip to coat well.
  5. Then dredge each piece in the almond flour mixture, again turning to coat well.
  6. Place the dredged slices on parchment-lined baking sheets in a single layer, making sure they are not touching each other.
  7. Place the trays in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Then flip the slices over and bake for another 10 minutes, or until the slices start to get crisp and golden brown. (Note: all ovens are different, so check your slices occasionally to make sure they don't cook too quickly.)
  8. Meanwhile make the sauce: In a medium saucepan, combine the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, coconut sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  9. When the eggplant is done, remove it from the oven, and reduce the temperature to 350°F.
  10. Ladle some sauce into the bottom of a 13x11 baking dish (or a dish close to that size).
  11. Arrange eggplant slices over the sauce, putting them close to each other but not overlapping much.
  12. Spread some sauce over the eggplant. Layer some mozzarella over the sauce. Repeat with a second layer (and a third layer if you have extra eggplant).
  13. After you add your final layer of eggplant, finish with sauce, then mozzarella, and then sprinkle on the Parmesan.
  14. Bake for 20 minutes.
  15. Enjoy!

paleo eggplant parmesan

Vegan Skillet Zucchini Parmesan

If you are an eggplant parmesan lover, you have to try this recipe for vegan skillet zucchini parmesan!

vegan skillet zucchini parmesan

One of our favorite local restaurants serves the most amazing zucchini parmesan. I’m so used to avoiding cheese and I really never feel deprived in this area.  Well, almost never. But this zucchini parm is amazing, so I usually just take a tiny taste and then move away. Quickly. I mean, I physically have to push the dish to the other side of the table far from my reach. (I have to do this with bread baskets too.)  I’ve been saying for years that I am going to create a vegan version of this luscious dish, so that I can enjoy it too. Finally, the time has come. Here’s the recipe. And it’s awesome!

My daughter came home from college the other day and I was figuring out what to cook for her first night back at home. She’s a lover of that same zucchini dish, so I figured I’d give it a go. I always like to make something special for her when she comes home, and while I thought this vegan skillet zucchini parmesan would fit the bill, I was also a bit concerned because she really doesn’t love most vegan cheeses. So, I used 3 different types of vegan cheese that I’ve never tried before but have been reading rave reviews about… success!

I went to Whole Foods and I bought a vegan ricotta, a vegan mozzarella, and a vegan Parmesan cheese… in various brands that I’ve been wanting to try. These cheeses were so much better than I expected them to be; even Shelby was pleasantly surprised. And that makes me really happy.

If you’re looking for another vegan comfort food dish, you also have to try my Vegan Macaroni And Cheese recipe!

vegan skillet zucchini parmesan

This dish is not only delicious, but here are some of the reasons why it’s also a healing dish:

Zucchini cools your body off and makes you feel better during those hot days of summer. It helps your body release excess heat and it will make your mind feel more calm.

Onions are great for your immune system; they are a natural antihistamine. Recently, I recommended that a patient with bronchitis put sliced raw onions in her socks when she went to sleep… she woke up so much better; they actually can rid the body of bacteria. (I know I’ve told you this before, but it really is awesome!) Onion is a superhero in the food world!

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to aid in digestion and to help detoxify the body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections.

Cashews are really a multi-tasking nut. I use them all the time so I say it all the time: Cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts. Most of the fat in cashews is unsaturated and is made up of oleic acid; this is the same acid that is found in olive oil, making these nuts a heart-healty choice. I know some of you have a problem finding raw nuts sometimes — I’m happy to try to help you locate them if you need shopping suggestions, so just leave a comment and I will try to help. I buy then whenever and wherever I see them. I’m also lucky enough to live near a Whole Foods, so I sometimes buy them from the bulk bins here. For this recipe I found a great store-bought vegan cheese made from cashews, but I’ve been seeing so many delicious-looking recipes to make cashew cheese at home, so I’m going to try that next time… and please, if you have a great cashew cheese recipe, let me know!

In Asian medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten-free. Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation. I used an almond-based vegan ricotta cheese in this recipe, and I loved it!

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

vegan skillet zucchini parmesan

Vegan Skillet Zucchini Parmesan
Author: 
Recipe type: vegan, main dish, vegetarian, Italian
Cuisine: recipe inspired by: The Endless Meal
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
Slices of zucchini replace the pasta, and various vegan cheeses replace the dairy, making this vegan dish absolutely unbelievably amazing!
Ingredients
  • 1 med onion, chopped
  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • sea salt
  • 2 med zucchinis, cut in half horizontally, then cut into thin vertical slices
  • 5 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 28-oz can fire-roasted chopped tomatoes
  • 1 Tbs coconut sugar (I like this one)
  • 1 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 3 oz vegan ricotta cheese
  • 6 Tbs vegan shredded Parmesan
  • 8 oz vegan mozzarella cheese, cut or spooned into small chunks
  • 8 oz bruschetta mix or sun-dried tomato pesto (make your own or use store-bought)
  • 8 basil leaves, julienned
Instructions
  1. In a large, ovenproof sauté pan or deep skillet, heat the oil.
  2. Add the onion, seasoned with a bit of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally, until it begins to brown, about 10 minutes.
  3. Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  4. Stir in the tomatoes, coconut sugar, and balsamic vinegar.
  5. Turn off the heat, and slide the zucchini slices into the sauce so they cover the bottom of the pan under the sauce. Repeat 3 more times, stacking the slices on top of each other until you have stacks of 4 slices of zucchini covering the whole pan. Make sure you push each slice down into the sauce before adding the next, so that there is sauce in between each slice.
  6. Put dollops of the ricotta cheese all over the top of the zucchini.
  7. Then sprinkle the Parmesan all over.
  8. Next put chunks, shreds, or spoonfuls of the mozzarella all around the top.
  9. Cover the pan loosely with foil, turn the heat back on and let it simmer for 10 minutes.
  10. Preheat your broiler.
  11. Uncover the pan and place spoonfuls of the bruschetta mix or pesto all over the top.
  12. Place the pan under the broiler until the cheese is gooey and starts to brown.
  13. Sprinkle the basil over the top.
  14. Remove from the oven and let cool a bit, then serve with a big spoon and enjoy!

vegan skillet zucchini parmesan