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Chicken And Corn Skillet

You just have to love a meal that’s cooked and served in the same pan… This Chicken And Corn Skillet is comforting, healing, delicious and simple to make and to clean up!
chicken and corn skillet

I love a one-pan meal. I also love eating anything that is served in a skillet. There’s just something about it that is so comforting and delicious. When you cook and serve in the same skillet, you get to eat all of those deliciously crispy bits that stick to the bottom of the pan… yum!

I came home from vacation yesterday, and while I was doing the mountain of laundry that I came home with, I was perusing all of my favorite food blogs. I was kind of unplugged on vaca — which was awesome, by the way — but I’ve been looking forward to reading all of my foodie mail and seeing all of my favorite food blogger’s creations that I missed.

So, when I came across Tieghan’s recipe for garlic butter creamed corn chicken on Half Baked Harvest, I just knew I had to make a version of it. And, I was not disappointed.

It’s so important to eat what’s in season at the moment. And corn is in season!

Food that’s in season is more delicious, fresher, and healthier. And right now corn is everywhere. I even wrote an article about Late Summer Seasonal Eating, so take a look.

I went to the market to buy some corn. But… best laid plans…

Corn is one of the foods that I won’t buy unless it’s organic. The crops are just too heavily sprayed and generally, non-organic corn is a GMO crop… and I won’t do that.

I got to the market, and no organic corn! And now, of course, I can’t get this recipe out of my head, so I bought frozen organic corn. So much for seasonal produce…

But anyway, let’s get back to this awesome recipe. It’s just so good. And simple. And it’s made all in one pan. The chicken is moist and the corn is creamy, but it’s made without any cream or milk.

Oh, and did I mention the bacon? Bacon and corn are a match made in heaven.

If you like this recipe, you need to try my recipe for Chicken With Artichokes And Sun Dried Tomatoes — it’s a skillet meal too.

chicken and corn skillet

I love to customize recipes for specific health concerns. Let me customize a skillet recipe for you that will work for whatever’s going on in your body now… I’m such a geek that I really do get excited about doing this. So CLICK HERE to be taken directly into my calendar to sign up for your free phone consultation.

chicken and corn skillet

The ingredients in this chicken and corn skillet recipe are truly healing. Keep reading and you’ll learn the health benefits of each ingredient you’ll be eating…

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Here are some of the amazing healing ingredients in this chicken and corn skillet:

Corn is one of the foods that if I can’t find organic, I just won’t eat because the crops are so heavily sprayed and are full of GMOs. As more people are expressing concern about GMOs, it seems to be getting easier to find good corn at the market. Corn actually benefits the gallbladder, is good for hepatitis, heart disease, and hypertension. Cornsilk is a Chinese herb (Yu Mi Xu). It’s often used to reduce edema, help with hepatitis and reduce the symptoms of some painful urinary conditions. If you can’t find organic fresh corn, buy a bag of organic frozen corn!

Chicken is also something I always buy organic. Organic chicken is a great, healthy protein to give you energy, lessen the pain of some types of arthritis, and boost your system when you are particularly weak — like after surgery, childbirth, or illness. Chicken is good for nourishing the blood and it’s a healthy source of protein and vitamin B6.

Tapioca is a starch that comes from the cassava plant. It’s not really a flour in the traditional sense; it’s grain and gluten free. It’s good for your circulation and your digestion. Oftentimes I will make recipes with tapioca flour — it’s a great coating for this chicken because it helps brown the chicken and it also helps to thicken the sauce.

Onions are great for your immune system; they are a natural antihistamine. Recently, I recommended that a patient with bronchitis put sliced raw onions in her socks when she went to sleep… she woke up so much better; they actually can rid the body of bacteria. (I know I’ve told you this before, but it really is awesome!) Onion is a superhero in the food world!

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

chicken and corn skillet

If you make this Chicken And Corn Skillet, please be sure to let me know in the comments below. I love hearing how you like a recipe, and I love to answer your questions! If you make it, be sure to take a photo and tag me and post it on Instagram.

Chicken And Corn Skillet
Author: 
Recipe type: main dish, chicken, one pan meal
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Half Baked Harvest
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
This Chicken And Corn Skillet is everything you need and want in one single pan -- you cook and serve in the same pan! And it is delicious!
Ingredients
  • 2-1/4 lb boneless chicken thighs (about 8 pieces)
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • ¼ cup tapioca flour
  • 8 oz bacon, cooked and chopped
  • 2 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 med onion, chopped
  • 8 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 lb corn kernels (fresh, or frozen thawed)
  • 1 Tbs ghee (or butter)
  • ½ tsp hot red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • ½ cup dairy-free Parmesan cheese (or use traditional Parmesan, if you are not dairy-free)
  • about 10 fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces
Instructions
  1. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and toss it with the tapioca flour, until fairly evenly coated.
  2. Cook bacon in a large skillet and place on paper towels to drain.
  3. Add the chicken to the hot bacon fat remaining in the skillet and cook over medium-high heat until browned on both sides, about 10 mins.
  4. Remove the browned chicken to a plate.
  5. If there's not much bacon fat left in the pan, add olive oil to the pan.
  6. Add the onion and saute until softened, about 3 minutes.
  7. Add the garlic cloves, butter, red pepper flakes, and corn to the onion.
  8. Cook, stirring for 2 minutes.
  9. Add the chicken broth and place the chicken in the mixture.
  10. Cover and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes.
  11. Remove the cover and simmer an additional 10 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.
  12. Stir in the Parmesan.
  13. Top with bacon and basil.
  14. Serve in the skillet and enjoy!

chicken and corn skillet

Eating Seasonally In Late Summer

Do you know what foods you should be eating now that summer is well underway? Read ahead to learn all about eating seasonally in late summer to get the most nutrients and the biggest bang for your buck…

eating seasonally in late summer

Eating Seasonally In Late Summer Is A Must

By eating what’s in season, you are getting the highest level of nutrients from your food at the most affordable prices. Fruits and vegetables that are in season are reasonably priced, provide the most nutrition, and are less-likely to be tampered with in terms of additives and preservatives. 

Summer is the perfect time to stay out of indoor grocery stores and spend more time at outdoor markets. The farmers markets are bursting with colors and freshness and gorgeousness. If you don’t usually go to an outdoor market this time of year, you really have to try it… it will make your day! Do you know that saying “you eat first with your eyes”? Well, it’s true. The more beautiful food appears to you, the better it will taste.  And, in the summer you can add your sense of smell to that goodness equation because the scents and aromas as you peruse the markets are absolutely infatuating.

I don’t know about you, but when I smell fresh corn or fresh tomatoes that are being kissed by the sun… oh my… I just end up buying everything in sight because I must have it all. Some of my best recipes have been created because I have so much extra summer produce sitting on my counter and in the fridge.

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I have picked my 6 favorite, nutritious, and healing late summer produce items and detailed them for you below. Be sure to add these 6 items to your basket when you are at the market. Eating seasonally in late summer is so delicious!

If you eat the right foods and herbs for your unique body and circumstances, you can heal yourself. All you need is the correct information. And I’m here to give it to you. So, read on and learn more ways you can easily start to heal yourself with my top favorite 6 fruits and vegetables that are in season during late summer. And, if you want to learn more about healing whatever your specific concerns are, I’d love to help you create a healthy lifestyle plan specifically for your unique needs, so sign up for a free phone consultation and we can chat about it.

Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this post for some awesome late summer produce recipes. If you are like me, and you end up with enough food for an army instead of a single family, I’ve got you covered.

 

Summer Is Well Underway — What Should You Eat?

1. Tomatoes

In Chinese medicine, we use tomatoes to smooth your digestion and to help detoxify your body. They are also good to combat excess cholesterol, lessen inflammation and curb asthma. Tomatoes can also quench thirst, and they can help fight some kidney infections. This goes for all varieties of tomatoes. So, go grab some yellow, red, orange, purple, green, and brown tomatoes. Mix up the varieties too — heirloom, roma, cherry, grape… they are all so good this time of year.

At this time of year, tomatoes are at their most flavorful. They ripen in the sun and the taste just explodes in your mouth. This is the season when you can eat a tomato in your hand as if it were a peach. I love to thickly slice some tomatoes, put them on a plate, drizzle them with a good quality extra-virgin olive oil, and sprinkle them with sea salt. Simple and perfect.

2. Peppers

Like tomatoes, peppers come in so many beautifully different shapes, sizes, and tastes.

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and, research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsaicin. Capsaicin actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve some types of arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

One of my favorite things to do with peppers is to slice them up and dip them in hummus — this keeps me from eating the chips and I’m the big winner here because summertime peppers are better than chips any day of the week! I like to mince or slice some bright colored hot peppers and add them to eggs, soups, and my collard-wrapped sandwiches. Yum!

3. Corn

Corn is one of the foods that if I can’t find organic, I just won’t eat.  Many corn crops are so heavily sprayed and are full of GMOs, so if I can’t find it organic, it stays at the market. But,once  late summer arrives, organic corn is easier to find — so I’m a happy camper.  As more people are expressing concern about GMOs, it seems to be getting easier to find good corn at the markets even a bit off season.

Corn benefits the gallbladder, is good for hepatitis, heart disease, and hypertension. Cornsilk is a Chinese herb (Yu Mi Xu). It’s often used to reduce edema, help with hepatitis and to reduce the symptoms of some painful urinary conditions. If you can’t find organic fresh corn, buy a bag of organic frozen corn!

When corn is seasonally at peak  in late summer, I love to eat it raw. The kernels are so sweet and crunchy. When you scroll down to the bottom of this post, be sure to check out my recipe for Raw Corn And Vegetable Salad.  I love to add raw foods into my diet whenever possible and I urge you to do the same. Cooking food destroys some of its nutrients and natural enzymes; getting  fresh raw food’s full compliment of enzymes helps with digestion.

4. Figs

Figs have the highest amount of calcium of any fruit and are a good source of fiber. They are good for anemia, constipation, indigestion, and fever, and they are also good at fighting fatigue and boosting memory retention. Basically, figs are brain food, a digestive aid, and an energy-booster!

If you are craving sweets and you happen to have some fresh figs on hand, grab one, sit in a comfy chair, sniff the sweetness, and slowly eat your fig. The sensory pleasure is so much more than what you’d get from candy or cake! Also, it’s great to dice up some figs and use them on hot cereals, yogurt, or as a topping for  your favorite nice cream. Another tip: instead of sweetening your smoothie with another type of sweetener, add a fig to the mix in your blender!

5. Melons

Melons are great at this time of year. They are sweet, ripe, and prevalent. Eat all of the varieties to get the full benefits of the wealth of nutrition this amazing fruit offers.

All types of melons are good antioxidants, and help cleanse the body.  In Chinese medicine, we use them to lessen the discomfort of some types of arthritis, digestive issues, fever, and some kidney and bladder conditions.

Watermelon is actually considered a Chinese herb (Xi Gua).  It’s great if you are overheated during these hot days; it cools you off from the inside-out and it quenches thirst. The rind of the watermelon is also a Chinese herb (Xi Gua Pi). This is even more powerful at relieving summer heat and generating fluids in the body. So, the next time you are cutting up a beautiful fresh melon, don’t cut off all of the white/light green rind and eat a little bit of it along with the sweet red flesh — it will do your body good!

And, we shouldn’t leave out the seeds… watermelon seeds can be boiled in water and you can drink this as a tea that is good for your kidneys.

Cantaloupe and honeydew also have many of the same benefits mentioned above. Cantaloupe also has a good amount of vitamin C and minerals. Honeydew is a good source of vitamin B and minerals.

Bottom line: go out and buy some melons while they are in season!

6. Grapes

All colors and varieties of grapes are in season during late summer. My favorite variety is the dark purple or red grapes. The darker the color of your grapes, the better. Dark purple grapes contain compounds that inhibit the growth of cancer and detoxify the body.  If you can, buy the darkest grapes you can find, with the seeds in them, and eat them seeds and all because grape seeds are also good for protecting against cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease.

And, as an added benefit, red and purple grapes will boost your mood… hmm… taste great, make you happy, and fight illness… gotta get some!

For an awesome snack, wash some grapes, put them in the freezer, and grab these frozen treats whenever you want a sweet snack — simple, but sooooo good!

Here’s A Few Ways To Use These Late Summer Fruits And Vegetables

If you make any of these late summer recipes, please be sure to let me know in the comments below. I love hearing how you like a recipe, and I love to answer your questions! If you make it, be sure to take a photo and tag me and post it on Instagram.

1.  Raw Corn And Vegetable Salad

raw corn and vegetable salad

This salad is raw, can be customized however you like, and is the perfect accompaniment for all of your grilled and roasted dishes.

2.  Berry Fig Yogurt Parfait

berry fig yogurt parfait

Parfaits are just plain fun! And this one takes advantage of late summer’s figs and blackberries.

3.  Kale With Tomatoes And White Beans

kale with tomatoes and white beans

This side dish is perfect for when you want a fresh-tasting warming plate of awesome veggies.

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Instant Pot Spring Vegetable Soup

Soup still hits the spot even when the days start to get warm.  This instant pot spring vegetable soup is perfect for those days — it will boost your immune system and make you feel good! Read more

Slow Cooker Dairy-Free Grain-Free Vegan Enchiladas

These slow cooker dairy-free grain-free vegan enchiladas are so simple and delicious…

slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas

I love anything in a wrap of any kind. I don’t know what it is, but things just taste better when they are rolled up. But when I started eating paleo, I sadly left my wraps behind. And I’ve so missed my burritos, tuna wraps, enchiladas, quesadillas… all of that great awesome “wrap-y” food. Enter… almond flour wraps. Yup, it’s these babies that allowed me to make this amazing recipe for slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas…

If you are like me and find that your body just looks and feels better without any grains in your diet, you can make this recipe and do the happy dance. Yay! Wraps that can be cooked and that are grain free — this is the greatest invention since sliced bread…

I made these on Monday, so I did a really big happy dance, because… and I’m going to tell you this even though I am a little embarrassed to admit this… I love to watch The Bachelor. I ate my enchiladas before The Bachelor came on, so I was doubly happy. I felt full yet healthy and I was ready for my favorite mindless 2 hours of TV. It was an awesome night.

I’ve been using almond flour wraps for awhile now, but I never tried to put them in the slow cooker. Until now. And, OMG, it worked out so much better than I could ever have hoped! I adapted this recipe from Real Simple — they get the credit for the original recipe idea, and it’s just awesome!

These slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas are stuffed with black beans and spinach and corns and deliciously creamy vegan cheese and turmeric and other great flavors. And, the slow cooker does all of the heavy lifting. All you do is mix the filling in a bowl, roll ‘m up, and off you go.

If you are looking for another great vegan slow cooker recipe, try my Vegan Slow Cooker Stuffed Peppers.

slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladasslow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas

Here are some of the great things these slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas can do for you:

In Chinese medicine, black foods are known as the best foods to strengthen the body and nourish the blood. We recommend them for many people who suffer from chronic lower back pain, knee pain and infertility. Black beans have the highest amount of antioxidants of any bean, they are high in fiber and are good for the heart.

Turmeric is actually a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

It is true that spinach contains iron, but it’s this vegetable’s lesser-known qualities that really hold my admiration. Spinach contains a substance that helps eliminate prostate cancer. It’s also great for your bones and also for memory loss. Diabetic patients may find that eating spinach helps combat excessive thirst and can even be good for night blindness. Spinach can inhibit the body’s ability to absorb calcium, so calcium-rich foods should be avoided when eating this leafy green.

Corn is one of the foods that if I can’t find organic, I just won’t eat because the crops are so heavily sprayed and are full of GMOs. As more people are expressing concern about GMOs, it seems to be getting easier to find good corn at the market. Corn actually benefits the gallbladder, is good for hepatitis, heart disease, and hypertension. Cornsilk is a Chinese herb (Yu Mi Xu). It’s often used to reduce edema, help with hepatitis and reduce the symptoms of some painful urinary conditions. If you can’t find organic fresh corn, buy a bag of organic frozen corn!

In Asian medicine, nuts are known to be good for your brain, heart, skin and reproductive system. Almonds are particularly nutritious. They are a good source of protein and they give you energy. And, they are gluten-free. Almonds will help relieve a cough and asthma and are also good for constipation. This recipe uses almond flour tortilla instead of traditional ones.

slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas

Slow Cooker Dairy Free Grain-Free Vegan Enchiladas
Author: 
Recipe type: paleo, vegan, slow cooker, crockpot, Mexican, comfort food
Cuisine: recipe adapted from: Real Simple
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 3
 
This recipe is simple. And grain-free. And vegan. And comforting. What else could you ask for?
Ingredients
  • 1 15-oz can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 9 oz fresh spinach, steamed, squeezed dry in a clean dish towel
  • 1-1/4 cups frozen organic corn
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • ¼ tsp chipotle chili powder
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • 7-oz sliced vegan American cheese (I used Straight From The Heart brand), divided
  • 2 16-oz jars mild salsa
  • 6 almond flour tortillas
  • sliced radishes, sliced scallions, lime wedges for garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, combine the beans, spinach, corn, cumin, salt, pepper, turmeric, chili powder, garlic powder, and ½ the cheese.
  2. Pour one jar of salsa into the bottom of the slow cooker.
  3. Lay the tortillas out on a flat surface and divide the bean mixture among them. Roll them up, and arrange them, seam-side-down, in a single layer on top of the salsa.
  4. If you have any filling left in the bowl, pour it on top of the enchiladas.
  5. Pour the second jar of salsa on top.
  6. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top of the salsa.
  7. Cook on low or medium heat for 2-1/2 hours, or until the cheese is melted and everything is hot.
  8. Serve with radishes, lime wedges and scallions, if desired. Enjoy!

slow cooker paleo vegan enchiladas

Raw Corn And Vegetable Salad

This raw corn and vegetable salad is a great way to incorporate more raw foods into your diet…

raw corn and vegetable salad

Here it is the day before Thanksgiving. Eating  light and healthy just seems like the right thing to do. Even more so than usual. It’s like going into survival mode. If I want to eat all that I want to eat tomorrow (and that’s a lot), then I better stick to a smart plan today. This raw corn and vegetable salad is a big part of my perfect plan.

This year, I am not hosting the holiday in my home, so I don’t have as much control over the food as I usually do. If I had my druthers, I’d have a couple of raw dishes on the table, but the likelihood of this happening is next to none… so I did the next best thing and I made a big bowl of this raw corn and vegetable salad today. Yup, it was sashimi for lunch and raw veg salad for dinner. I should have enough room for all of that awesomeness tomorrow…

This is a big delicious bowl of crunchy, fresh tasting, deliciousness.

It’s kind of weird for a salad of mine, but there is no dressing on this salad.

That’s right. None. Just lime juice. And it’s perfect this way… and not just because I want to pig out tomorrow…

This salad has lots of veggies, some fruit (kiwis and pineapple), and lots of fresh herbs. It’s dishes like this that make me think I might be able to be a raw foodist. But, I know that’s not going to happen because I just love hot food. But, this raw corn and vegetable salad is really that good.

raw corn and vegetable salad

Here are just some of the ingredients that are so healing in this raw corn and vegetable salad:

Corn is one of the foods that if I can’t find organic, I just won’t eat because the crops are so heavily sprayed and are full of GMOs. As more people are expressing concern about GMOs, it seems to be getting easier to find good corn at the market. Corn actually benefits the gallbladder, is good for hepatitis, heart disease, and hypertension. Cornsilk is a Chinese herb (Yu Mi Xu). It’s often used to reduce edema, help with hepatitis and reduce the symptoms of some painful urinary conditions. If you can’t find organic fresh corn, buy a bag of organic frozen corn!

Cucumbers are awesome, both for taste and health reasons. In Chinese medicine, they are known to have exceptional healing capabilities. They cool the body, expel toxins, purify the blood, strengthen the heart, moistens the large intestines and the lungs and kill tapeworms. They are good to eat if you have swelling in your hands or feet, or if you have a bladder infection.

Carrots help strengthen the organs in your body. They also are good for the eyes (this is their claim to fame) and they promote healthy digestion. Many moons ago, people used to make carrot tea to ward off measles and to prevent cancer. Carrots help detoxify the body and in today’s world of Chinese medicine, they are prescribed to ease constipation and tonsillitis.

Scallions, as I tell you often, are one of my favorites. In Chinese medicine, the root of the scallion is a healing herb (Cong Bai). I always keep scallions on hand in my refrigerator so that I can whip up a batch of cold and flu fighting tea (scallion roots and ginger) the second anyone feels that scratchy throat coming on. It helps the body sweat out toxins. Scallions are antiviral and antibacterial; they are good for the common cold and general nasal congestion — just don’t eat too many if you have a fever.

Bell peppers help with indigestion. If you are feeling bloated and full from over-eating a lot lately, consuming bell peppers will help reduce this feeling. They are also good for blood circulation and research has shown that they are good for people with a low appetite or anorexia. It used to be common in China to use green pepper tea to soothe indigestion.

Kale is everywhere these days. It is extremely nutritious, and because it to so popular you can find it already washed and prepared in lots of markets. I bought this kale already shredded and washed. If you are using a whole bunch of kale, make sure you clean the leaves thoroughly and remove the center thick stems if they bother you (me… I don’t really mind them if the kale is cooked). This dark leafy green is a great source of fiber and calcium. It’s also rich in many minerals, including magnesium, iron and potassium. One serving contains 200% of the daily requirements of Vitamin C and 180% of Vitamin A.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese Parsley. It is good for the common cold, indigestion, and energy flow in the body. An old Chinese remedy for the common cold and even for measles was to drink cilantro and mint tea. Cilantro is one of those herbs you either love or hate; I’m a lover…

Basil has anti-viral and anti-bacterial capabilities. It also is good for settling your stomach, and it’s good at lessening the symptoms of the common cold and its accompanying cough. Basil is a spiritual herb — the scent actually calms you; you can boil some in a pot and let the aroma fill the air, you can just leave some around the house, you can toss a bunch in your bath water (I love to do this), or you can use an essential oil with basil to get some great calming effects.

Pineapple is great for your digestion and it can help stop diarrhea. It’s especially good in the summer because it fights against heatstroke.

Hot peppers contain more vitamin C than any other vegetable and they are good at fighting off the common cold. So, if you like spice, as I do, use a generous amount of whatever hot peppers you like. The main component of hot peppers is capsicum. Capsicum actually works with your body and mind to make you feel happy. It’s also good for reducing swelling and can relieve arthritic joint pain. If you have high blood pressure, check with your doctor before eating too many hot peppers because they can actually raise the blood pressure in some people.

raw corn and vegetable salad

Raw Corn And Vegetable Salad
Author: 
Recipe type: salad, vegetables, fruit, side dish
Cuisine: raw, vegan, vegetarian, whole30, paleo
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
There's nothing more delicious or cleaner tasting than this raw vegetable salad dressed with fresh lime juice. Serve it with whatever's on your menu today!
Ingredients
  • 2 small (Kirby) cucumbers, finely diced
  • 1 medium tomato, finely diced
  • 2 carrots, finely diced
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, finely diced
  • 1-1/2 cups baby kale, chopped
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 3 cups corn kernels
  • 5 large basil leaves, chopped
  • ¼ cup finely diced fresh pineapple
  • 1 kiwi, diced
  • ½ an avocado, diced
  • 1-inch piece of jalapeño pepper, finely minced, or to taste
  • juice of 2 limes
  • sea salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Toss well.
  3. Let the healing begin.

raw corn and vegetable salad

Vegetarian Shepherd’s Pie

This vegetarian shepherd’s pie tastes even better than the traditional version!

vegetarian shepherd's pie

I go through different food phases all the time. Sometimes I’m in a vegan phase or a vegetarian phase or a pescatarian phase… that’s why when I’m asked to label how I eat I usually say I am a flexitarian. To me, this means I eat healthy, but I like to switch it up depending on how my body feels at a particular time or in a particular season.

Right now I’m in a vegetarian phase. I’ve been eating vegetarian, but without the cheese. It’s kind of in between vegan and vegetarian. So, I’ve been saying no to meat and fish, but yet to eggs and butter. And I feel good… I don’t know if this will be a long phase or a quickie, but I like it!

This vegetarian shepherd’s pie recipe is awesome. Instead of being filled with meat, it’s piled high with lentils, mushrooms, peas, and corn. And, it’s topped with real mashed potatoes. Yup, authentic, buttery, creamy, mashed potatoes (but without the cream)… so good…

I’ve seen (and made) several variation of shepherd’s pie recipes, including really meaty ones and some vegan ones. This is the first one that I’ve made that’s vegetarian. The healthy veggies are sautéed with great spices and they go so well with the buttery taters that it’s just awesome. If you are looking for a vegan version, one of my favorite blogs, Minimalist Baker has a great one that also uses lentils.

Truthfully, I think I probably stacked more mashed potatoes on top of this vegetarian shepherd’s pie than anyone in their right mind ever would, but I wouldn’t change a thing…

One of the ways I was able to rationalize using such a big layer of mashed potatoes was by boiling the potatoes in a pot with some great Chinese herbs. I added some raw Huang Qi and some Dang Shen (see below to learn more about why these herbs are so great) to my pot of boiling potatoes so the great medicinal properties of the herbs infused into my heap of potatoes — so, why not eat a lot of them…?

If you are looking for another great recipe using lentils, try my Lentil Vegetable Soup.

vegetarian shepherd's pie

There are a lot of reasons to make this recipe for vegetarian shepherd’s pie (other than as a vehicle for sky-high mashed potatoes):

Lentils help lower cholesterol, manage blood sugar levels, are high in vitamin B and protein, and have hardly any fat. They are a good source of long-term energy and are very high in fiber. These tiny legumes also help with digestion and they are the perfect protein to eat in the summer because they actually clear the body of excess heat; long ago, cold lentil soup was prescribed for patients with heatstroke or fever.

I love mushrooms. In Chinese medicine, mushrooms ARE medicine. They are herbs. They are one of the most healing foods around. In China, mushrooms have been used for many years as part of a natural cancer treatment. They are one of the best immune-boosting foods around.

Potatoes are good at soothing ulcers and neutralizing acid in the stomach and they help relieve constipation. These tubers also can help relieve arthritic inflammation. So, even though sweet potatoes are thought of as the white potato’s more nutrition sister, regular old potatoes can be just what the doctor ordered.

Green peas are good for the digestion, especially if you are feeling constipated. In the olden days, people used to drink pea juice with their meals to avoid indigestion.

Corn is one of the things I won’t buy unless I can find it organic; it’s a crop that’s just too heavily sprayed with chemicals and so much corn is GMO that I really like to be careful. I used fresh corn for this recipe but feel free to use frozen if that’s what’s available to you. Corn helps those who have hepatitis, heart disease, and hypertension. Cornsilk is also a Chinese herb (Yu Mi Xu). It’s often used to reduce edema,  and can reduce the symptoms of some painful urinary conditions.

Turmeric is also a Chinese herb (Jiang Huang). It is great for reducing inflammation throughout the body. If you suffer from aches and pains in your joints, try turmeric. It can help relieve menstrual pain and some other abdominal pains but, if you are pregnant, ask your doctor before you eat too much turmeric.

Huang Qi is like magic; it builds qi/gives you energy… you can really feel it working while you are eating. My family makes fun of my excitement for herbs, but they also are happy to reap the rewards when they eat my herb-infused foods, so think about trying out some herbs the next time you boil a pot of something…

I also added Dang Shen to the boiling water. To the novice, this herb looks like ordinary thick twigs. To me, these sticks are like gold. I added these herbs for energy; to raise my qi. If you are feeling fatigued, I highly recommend looking into some of these herbs.

vegetarian shepherd's pie

Vegetarian Shepherd's Pie
Author: 
Recipe type: casserole, comfort food
Cuisine: vegetarian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6-8
 
Here's a comfort food, healthy casserole that's also vegetarian. Heaps of mashed potatoes top lentils, mushrooms and vegetables... it's easy and delicious.
Ingredients
  • 1-1/4 cup dried lentils, cooked until done, but not mushy
  • 8 medium/large yellow potatoes, unpeeled, cut into large chunks
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 3 Tbs grass-fed organic butter
  • 2 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 med onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2 portabella mushroom caps, cut into small dice
  • ½ cup green peas, cooked (I took the easy way out and bought them from a salad bar)
  • ½ cup organic corn, cooked (this came from the salad bar too)
  • leaves from 2 large thyme sprigs
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • ¼ tsp chipotle chili powder
  • ½ cup tomato sauce (homemade, jarred, or canned)
  • 2 sticks of raw Huang Qi (an optional Chinese herb)
  • 1 stick of raw Dang Shen (an optional Chinese herb)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Boil the potatoes along with any Chinese herbs you are using in a large pot of salted water. Cook until the potatoes are soft. Drain the potatoes and discard the herbs.
  3. Mash the hot potatoes together with the butter and salt and pepper to taste. You can do this by hand or with a food processor (I used the processor).
  4. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add the oil.
  5. Saute the onions, garlic, and mushrooms for about 5 minutes, stirring often, until the veggies are softened.
  6. Add the cooked lentils, peas, corn, spices, and tomato sauce. Stir, cooking, for about 3 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Spoon the lentil mixture into a 9x9-inch baking pan. Spread the mashed potatoes over the top.
  8. Place the casserole in the oven and bake for about 30 minutes, or until the inside is hot and bubbly and the top starts to brown. If your casserole dish is overflowing (like mine was), you may want to put something under the dish to catch any oozing filling.
  9. Enjoy!

vegetarian shepherd's pie